Here we go again! Malloy Administration misleads mother on Common Core SBAC Test

Governor Malloy and his administration are continuing to tell Connecticut parents that they do not have the right to opt their children out of the unfair, discriminatory and inappropriate Common Core Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium (SBAC) Test that begins next month.

Even worse, local school districts are using that false information to intimidate Connecticut parents.

Parents — do not let them fool you – you can and should opt your children out of these destructive tests, a set of Common Core standardized exams that are rigged to ensure that up to 7 in 10 children fail.

When Christine Murphy, a resident of Bristol, Connecticut, informed her son’s school that he would not be taking the Common Core SBAC Tests, the assistant principal, on behalf of the superintendent, informed her that she did not have the right to opt her child out of the test.

[School Superintendents!  Stop harassing parents for opting their children out of the Common Core SBAC Test]

Christine, recognizing that this is still America, reached out to the NBC Trouble Shooters who did a news segment about her attempt to utilize her fundamental right to determine what is best for her child.

Interestingly rather than telling NBC news the truth, the whole truth and nothing be the truth, the spokesperson for Governor Malloy’s Department of Education and the paid lobbyist for one of Connecticut’s Corporate Education Reform Industry groups decided that they would intentionally mislead the mother, NBC news and the people of Connecticut into thinking the mom did not have the right to opt her child out of the Common Core SBAC Test.

Sadly, NBC news fell for the trick and failed to report the truth.

Governor Malloy’s State Department of Education issued a statement which read;

“These laws do not provide a provision for parents to ‘opt-out’ their children from taking state tests. These mandates have been in effect for many years and the State Department of Education, as well as all public schools, must comply.”

– Kelly Donnelly, Connecticut Department of Education

The Malloy administration’s response is at best disingenuous and should more appropriately be called blatantly deceitful considering the reality about parental rights in Connecticut when it comes to the Common Core SBAC Test.

The FACT is there is no federal or state law, regulation or policy that allows the government or local school district to punish parents or their children if the parent refuses to allow their child or children to participate in the Common Core SBAC testing scam.

Yes it is true that Governor Malloy and his administration have been telling parents that they do not have the right to opt their children out.  But those statements are false.

When Stefan Pryor, Governor Malloy’s Commissioner of Education, was finally brought before the General Assembly’s Education Committee on March 12, 2014 to address concerns surrounding the Common Core and Common Core SBAC testing system, Commissioner Pryor admitted that,

“On an individual level, I don’t believe that there’s any specific provision in law regarding consequences… To my knowledge there are no state provisions that are specific, or no federal provisions that are specific to an individual student.”

At the same public hearing, Allan B. Taylor, the Chairperson of the Connecticut State Board of Education stated,

 “There is no law that says they can’t. Certainly no state law that says they can’t. Therefore, residually, presumably they have that right … but that is the parent’s choice, the local district’s choice. The State Department of Education will not be reaching down and sanctioning parents.”

The state and local districts will not be punishing parents and their children because they have no legal right to take any action against parents for removing their children from the Common Core SBAC tests.

What the Connecticut General Statute §10-14n(e) does say is that,

“No public school may require achievement of a satisfactory score on a mastery examination, or any subsequent retest on a component of such examination as the sole criterion of promotion or graduation.” 

This means that towns cannot promote or graduate a student on the basis of their Common Core SBAC Test score and they certainly cannot hold back a student or refuse to allow them to graduate based on their Common Core SBAC Test score.

Unfortunately, NBC news failed to do its job.

Rather than push past the political spin coming from the Malloy administration, the reporter simply accepted the misleading statement issued by the Connecticut State Department of Education.

Connecticut citizens deserve better from their government and the media.

You can see the NBC segment by going to http://www.nbcconnecticut.com/troubleshooters/State-Prohibits-Parents-From-Opting-Kids-Out-of-Testing-291119901.html

School Superintendents!  Stop harassing parents for opting their children out of the Common Core SBAC Test

With the Common Core Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium (SBAC) Testing beginning in less than a month, more and more parents are informing their local school districts that they have decided that their children will not be taking the unfair, discriminatory and inappropriate Common Core SBAC tests this year.

Parents who understand the issues associated with the Common Core SBAC Testing Scam are opting their children out.

Despite repeated posts here at Wait, What? and the work of a number of state-wide efforts to inform state and local officials that they must respect a parent’s fundamental right to opt their children out of the Common Core SBAC Test, a significant number of local school superintendents, and their staff, continue to mislead parents, throw up barriers or harass parents into believing that they have lost their right to protect their children from an unfair test that is rigged to ensure that as many as 7 in 10 children fail.

So once again, let us be clear!

  • There is no federal or state law, regulation or policy that prohibits a parent or guardian from opting their children out of these inappropriate, unfair and discriminatory tests.
  • There is no federal or state law, regulation or policy that allows the government or local school districts to punish parents or their children if the parent refuses to allow their child or children to participate in the Common Core SBAC testing scam.

Not only is there no law, regulation or policy that prohibits parents from opting their children out of the Common Core SBAC test, but although the Malloy administration issued a memo last year instructing superintendents, principals and local school officials on how to mislead parents, when Governor Malloy’s Commissioner of Education was finally brought before the General Assembly’s Education Committee on March 12, 2014 to address concerns surrounding the Common Core and Common Core SBAC testing system, Commissioner Pryor admitted that,

“On an individual level, I don’t believe that there’s any specific provision in law regarding consequences… To my knowledge there are no state provisions that are specific, or no federal provisions that are specific to an individual student.”

The Chairman of the State Board of Education, Attorney Alan Taylor, agreed with the Commissioner and went even further stating that there was no legal action that the state or school district could take to punish a parent or child who opted out of the Common Core SBAC test.

While a law clarifying that parents have the opt their children out of the Common Core SBAC test might be helpful to school officials, and such legislation has been introduced into this year’s General Assembly, the underlying issue would remain the same….A parent’s right to opt their children out of the Common Core SBAC test cannot denied.

The latest inappropriate effort to mislead parents comes from Bristol Connecticut, where the Assistant Principal of Bristol High School was put into the unenviable position of trying to instruct Chris, a mother of a student at Bristol High School that she could not opt her child out of the Common Core SBAC Test.

Bristol High School’s Assistant Principal wrote;

“Connecticut State Statute mandates that all students take the Smarter Balanced Assessment…No provision has been made to “opt out” of these tests. Dr. Solek our superintendent has instructed that you will need to submit your request in writing outlining your specific reasons for not taking the test. She, in turn, will alert the CT State Department of Education.”

Yes, Connecticut does have a law that states that all students shall take Mastery Test in grades 3-8 and in 11th grade.  However, putting aside the fact that the Common Core SBAC test is hardly a true mastery test, state and local school officials know that, on average, about 3,000 Connecticut public school students have failed to take the Connecticut Mastery Test each and every year.

And the 30,000 students who have failed to take the Connecticut Master Test were not punished and could not have been punished by state or the local school district for failing to take the Mastery Test

State and local education officials also know that Connecticut State Statute 10-14n(e) states,

“No public school may require achievement of a satisfactory score on a mastery examination, or any subsequent retest on a component of such examination as the sole criterion of promotion or graduation.”

If public schools may not require satisfactory achievement on a mastery examination in order to move the child up a grade or graduate, then school districts certainly can’t require an unsatisfactory grade or no grade at all on the mastery test as a requirement to promote or graduate a student.

The notion that students must take the test or else has no basis in law or practice in the state of Connecticut and the abuse of students and their parents by state and local school officials has got to stop.

If Governor Malloy and his Commissioner of Education want to legally prevent parents from opting their children out of the destructive Common Core SBAC Test then they need to introduce legislation to that end and convince a majority of the members of the Connecticut General Assembly to pass a law that forbids parents from opting their children out and providing the state and local districts with a mechanism to punish parents or their children if the students do not take the unfair Common Core SBAC Test.

And while Governor Malloy ponders taking that step, the truth is that this is still America and the reality here in Connecticut is that THERE IS NO LAW that prevents parents from opting their children out of the Common Core SBAC test.

Enough is enough – state and local school officials must stop misleading and harassing parent about their fundamental rights.

If you are told by your school district that you can’t opt your child out of the Common Cores SBAC Test, please send that correspondence here to Wait, What? ([email protected]) so that we can warn other parents in that district.

Other Wait, What? Blog posts about this issue include;

Parents can (and should) consider opting their children out of the Common Core SBAC Tests

Question – Can my child graduate without taking the absurd Common Core SBAC Test?

How much will the absurd Common Core SBAC Test cost Connecticut taxpayers?

ALERT! Parents – the Common Core SBAC Test really is designed to fail your children

In addition, parents can get more information about opting their children out of the Common Core SBAC test via the following links;

United Opt-Out:  Connecticut Guide

Connecticut Against the Common Core – Opting out of Standardized Testing

Connecticut Against the Common Core – Facebook Page

Common Core CriticsConnecticut – Guide to Opting Out

How To Opt Out of Standardized Testing in Connecticut

 

Malloy’s new charter schools – 1st up the Booker T. Washington Charter School in New Haven

Time to review the facts surrounding Malloy’s new charter schools…

Number #1: The Booker T. Washington Charter School.

The Booker T. Washington School may very well be Connecticut’s first foray into using public funds to pay for what appears to be a religiously connected school.  (We’ll pretend for a moment that such a move is not unconstitutional).

According to the charter school application approved by Malloy’s State Board of Education yesterday, there is a rather unseemly and bizarre connection between the Booker T. Washington Charter School, the charter school management company known as Jumoke/FUSE Inc. and the Varick Memorial African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church.

The application begins with the statement,

“The Booker T. Washington Academy is the brainchild of Reverend Eldren D. Morrison, Pastor of Varick Memorial African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church, New Haven, Connecticut (“Varick Memorial”)

The Governing Board of Directors for the Booker T. Washington Academy includes the following individuals,

  • Reverend Eldren D. Morrison: Founder of Booker T. Washington Academy, Pastor of Varick Memorial AME Zion Church, New Haven, Connecticut and New Haven, Community Leader
  • Jesse Phillips: Chief of Staff to Rev. Morrison at Varick Memorial AME Zion Church, New Haven, CT, and Community Economic Advisor)
  • Stacia Morrison: Academic Assistant, Bridgeport Public Schools and First Lady of Varick Memorial AME Zion Church, New Haven, Connecticut).

And on the next page of the application its states,  “Stacia Morrison is currently a member of the Board of Directors. She intends to apply for a staff position with the Academy and, if hired, will resign from the Board.”

The cost to Connecticut taxpayers to get the Booker T. Washington Charter School up and running over the next five years will exceed $27 million.

In addition, the taxpayers of New Haven will continue to pay for the transportation costs and special education costs of students attending the privately run Booker T. Washington Charter School.

A $27 million dollar public expenditure for the “brainchild” of a church minister and the school’s governing board will include the minister, his assistant and his wife … at least until she gets a  job at the school at which time she will resign her position on the governing board.

Interestingly no one on the State Board of Education even pressed the issue of the association between the school and a church or the notion that the founder’s wife will serve on the Board of Directors until she gets a state-funded job at the school.

For more read Wait, What? Post: Merging Church and State – The Booker T. Washington Charter School

 

The second rather unseemly and bizarre issue is that the new Booker T. Washington Charter School will be run by a charter school management company called the Family Urban Schools of Excellence, Inc.

Just two years ago there was nothing even called FUSE Inc. and now the charter school management company has a senior corporate officer sitting on the Connecticut State Board of Education, was just approved to run its fourth school in Connecticut and it still had time to take over management of a public school 1,500 miles away in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

FUSE Inc. is better known as Jumoke Academy Inc.  Their initial charter school is in Hartford and is called the Jumoke Academy.

Like all charter schools in Connecticut, the Jumoke Academy has refused to take its fair share of English language learners or students with special education needs.

With the passage of Governor Malloy’s “education reform” law in 2012, Stefan Pryor used his new-found power to take over Hartford’s Milner Elementary School and give it to Jumoke Academy to manage via a no bid contract.

The agreement was struck so quickly that the state and Jumoke didn’t even have a signed contract until well into the new school year.

The deal was particularly strange since the Jumoke Academy had never had a non-English speaking student in its six-year history and yet was given control of Milner Elementary, a school in which approximately 40 percent of students didn’t speak English or went home to households in which English was not the primary language.

A review of the demographics of the two schools made it clear that Jumoke could not possibly have been the best management company to take over the Hartford neighborhood school.

Percent of Students not fluent in English Milner School Jumoke Academy
2010 25% 0%

 

Percent of Students going home to non-English speaking households Milner School Jumoke Academy
2010 39% 0%

 

Percent of Students with special education needs Milner School Jumoke Academy
2010 11% 4%

 

To facilitate the expansion of his growing charter school company, Jumoke’s Chief Executive Officer Michael Sharpe, set up a holding company called the Family Urban Schools of Excellence, Inc. and named himself the new company’s Chief Executive Officer.

Less than a year later, although the State Department of Education had no data about the level of success Jumoke/FUSE Inc. was having at Hartford’s Milner School, Stefan Pryor and the State Board of Education gave Jumoke/FUSE, Inc. another no-bid contract, this time to take over the Dunbar Elementary School in Bridgeport.

In the meantime, Governor Malloy nominated Andrea Comer, the Chief Operating Officer of Jumoke/FUSE Inc. to serve as a member of the State Board of Education — the very entity responsible for approving charter school applications and holding charter schools accountable.

And now the State Board of Education approved Jumoke/FUSE Inc.’s application to open the Booker T. Washington Charter School in New Haven.

But as tens of millions of public funds are diverted to this lucky company, the most interesting development of all may well be that while Jumoke/FUSE Inc. claims to be focused on operating schools in Connecticut,  their Booker T. Washington application failed to mention that just a few months ago, Jumoke/FUSE Inc. was able to get a contract from the Louisiana Recovery School District in Baton Rouge, Louisiana to take over a school there. [The Louisiana Recovery School District is the state entity that Paul Vallas ran before he made his way to Bridgeport].

Imagine, a charter school management company that has been given two no-bid contracts from the Malloy administration to run public neighborhood schools and still managed to get control of a school in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

And although there is no data about how they are doing with their Connecticut schools or what time commitments they have made to their Baton Rouge school, not a single member of Malloy’s State Board of Education asked Jumoke/FUSE Inc. how it was going to have the time to open yet another charter school in Connecticut.

For more read Wait, What? blogs Friends in high places = lots of money! and The Malloy/Pryor Jumoke Charter School Gravy Train.

Malloy administration lines up votes to re-endorse the Common Core

Sometimes it is hard to know what to say…

Maybe Dannel “Dan” Malloy is simply on a mission to alienate as many parents, teachers and public school advocates as possible before he faces the electorate this coming November.

Or maybe the pay-off in campaign contributions is so great that it is worth selling ones soul to the corporate education reform industry.

Whatever the reason or reasons, before Malloy’s State Board of Education votes to divert millions of taxpayer funds to charter schools at its meeting tomorrow in Hartford, Board Chairman Alan Taylor will call for a vote so that the Malloy administration can re-commit itself, our state, our schools and our children to the Common Core.

While reasonable people can debate the merits of having a common set of educational standards, the truth is that Connecticut has had a long history of ensuring that our schools are guided by strong, evidence based, state educational standards.  Those standards have been improved over time through an open process that allows public participation and seeks to promote consensus building.

But thanks to George W. Bush and Barak H. Obama a decision was made in Washington D.C. to institute a top-down set of national standards that would apply to every state.  Except, of course, six states refused to participate and word is that Indiana just pulled out of the Common Core.

So now our “sort-of” national standards are being implemented.

But as teachers, school administrators, parents, students and taxpayers are learning, the hard way, a new set of “national” education standards has its benefits and its downsides.

In the midst of this debate comes news that Governor Malloy’s State Board of Education, with no public hearing and no notice to school districts, administrators, teachers or parents, will re-commit us to the Common Core with a vote at tomorrow’s State Board of Education meeting.

As I said, sometimes it is hard to know just what to say…

Here is the resolution that the State Board of Education will be adopting tomorrow;

Connecticut State Board of Education – TO BE PROPOSED: April 2, 2014  

Whereas, The State Board of Education (“Board”) is charged by law to ensure that all students shall have equal opportunity to receive a suitable program of educational experiences that prepares them for success in higher education and the workplace; and

Whereas, The Board is mindful of and concerned with inequities within and across classrooms throughout the State of Connecticut that unfairly impact students’ chances for success in Grades K-12 and in their future; and

Whereas, The State Board remains committed to implement the educational interests of the state by promoting the continuous improvement of education and providing leadership and support to school districts; and

Whereas, Toward this end, in July 2010 the Board adopted the Common Core State Standards, which are higher in rigor and more closely aligned with college and career expectations than the prior standards; now, therefore, be it

Resolved, That the State Board of Education stands firm in its belief that full and immediate implementation of the Common Core State Standards is necessary, and pledges its commitment to provide the necessary leadership, supports and resources for educators, students, and families, to ensure its success.

Oh and in case you missed it: Vallas lawyer’s gratuitous attack on those who sued Vallas

Although it didn’t get a lot of play at the time, following the Supreme Court’s decision in the Carmen Lopez v. Paul Vallas case that let Paul Vallas off the hook for not having the credentials necessary to get his 093 State of Connecticut superintendent certification, attorney Steven Ecker wrote a commentary piece following the court’s decision. 

Ecker is the attorney that the City of Bridgeport hired to back up their own lawyers when a Connecticut Superior Court Judge ruled that Vallas lacked the credentials to serve as a superintendent of schools in Connecticut.

As readers may recall, the Supreme Court overturned the lower court’s decision after basically finding that Connecticut’s Uniform Procedures Act required that those who opposed Stefan Pryor’s decision to waive Paul Vallas’ need for certification should have first gone to the Connecticut State Board of Education with their complaint before turning to the state courts for action.

Of course, considering the wholly inappropriate way in which Stefan Pryor, Malloy’s Commissioner of Education and Alan Taylor, Malloy’s appointed Chairman of the State Board, handled Vallas’ three credit independent study — calling it a school leadership program — the chance of a fair hearing before the State Board of Education was non-existent.

Regardless, the state’s highest court did what it did and effectively threw out the attempt to have Vallas removed for failing to complete the school leadership program as mandated by the Connecticut General Assembly and signed into law by Governor Malloy.

But as we now know, despite fulfilling his three-year contract or at least staying through the 2013-2014 teacher contract negotiations, as he bragged he would, Vallas announce that he has hightailing it back to Illinois in order to run for Lt. Governor in his home state.

What many people missed, at the time, was that after Vallas announced his impending departure and the Supreme Court ruled that it wasn’t the court’s role to determine whether the Malloy administration had followed the law when they decided a three-credit course counted as a school leadership program, attorney Ecker wrote a commentary piece for the blog “Only in Bridgeport.”

The commentary piece is a classic tribute to the approach Malloy, Pryor, Vallas, Adamowski and their ilk take to citizen input and the rights of the People to pursue their grievances.

In the piece, Ecker suggested that, “perhaps plaintiffs should follow their own guidance and reimburse the City for the cost of defending against a lawsuit that should never have been filed!”

Ecker introduces his piece by observing;

“Neither Mr. Vallas nor his lawyers are interested in gloating over the Supreme Court ruling. I have always felt – and I said in open court back in July – that I do not attribute bad faith to anyone here. Plaintiffs obviously hold strong views about what is best for the educational interests of Bridgeport’s children, and those views deserve respect. However, as I also suggested in the same courtroom on the same day, respect is a two-way street, and it is deeply unfortunate that Mr. Pattis, plaintiffs, and a handful of their supporters find themselves unable to acknowledge that people holding differing views are also acting in good faith, based on their own strongly held convictions about what is right for the schoolchildren of Bridgeport. The need that Mr. Pattis and others evidently feel to personally attack Mr. Vallas (and anyone else who has a differing viewpoint) is what I find so disconcerting. The allegations of corruption, cronyism, incompetence and the rest of the nonsense is both uncivil and irresponsible. It also is highly counter-productive in the long run.

The foregoing explains why I say what follows. Ordinarily I would not comment at any length. But the spinning endlessly promulgated by plaintiffs and their lawyer really warrants a response. So –”

You can find the entire commentary piece at: http://onlyinbridgeport.com/wordpress/vallas-lawyer-attacks-on-school-chief-uncivil-and-irresponsible-rule-of-law-honored-by-vallas/#more-53032

But for those who want the “spark-notes” version, Ecker saves the best for last in which he observes,

“One final point. The Supreme Court decision is by no means a “moot” point. It establishes an important legal point, and also allows Mr. Vallas to help facilitate an orderly transition to a new superintendent. No doubt, Mr. Vallas has just announced that he will be returning to Illinois to seek public office there. Plaintiffs and their lawyer appear pleased by the news, which of course is their right. It is unfair, however, for them or anyone else to use this recent development in an effort to justify the costly and unsuccessful litigation waged by plaintiffs against Vallas over the past seven months, and it is equally unfair to use this news as a reason to ignore or brush aside the Supreme Court’s holding. The rule of law deserves greater respect than that.”

Ring bells, but ignore Sheff!!!

Governor Malloy’s shocking approach to the 50th Anniversary of MLK Jr.’s speech:  Ring Bells, but ignore Sheff. 

In preparation for the 50th Anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have A Dream” speech, Governor Malloy’s PR operation has kicked into high gear issuing a press release in which he asks “Residents & Organizations To Ring Bells Wednesday To Commemorate” King’s speech.

But in what is certainly one of the most disturbing developments during his three years in office, Malloy’s effort to “celebrate” one of the most important speeches in American history is directly at odds with his policies —- policies that completely fail to follow Dr. King’s vision what the United States can and must become.

50 years ago tomorrow, Martin Luther King said,

“I have a dream that one day…little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls as sisters and brothers.”

In his historic speech, King laid out the evils of segregation and the fact our nation would never be able to live up to the true meaning of its creed as long as that segregation existed.

And yet here we are – fifty years later and 92 percent of Hartford Connecticut’s public school students are minority with more than 42 percent coming from homes whose primary language is not English.  In fact, Hartford Public Schools provide an education to a student population that speaks more than 70 languages.

But in the face of the incredible racial and ethnic isolation that has become the hallmark of Hartford and Connecticut’s other major urban areas, Governor Malloy has made it clear that he does not support additional efforts to reduce the segregation of our state’s schools.

According to a recent CT Mirror story, Thirty-seven percent of Hartford students attended integrated schools last school year.”

What integration efforts that have taken place in Connecticut are a direct result of the landmark Sheff v. O’Neill law suit that forced the state to develop a variety of voluntary desegregation policies.  It was seventeen years ago that the Connecticut Supreme Court ruled that “the state is responsible for reducing the inequalities caused by the racial isolation of Hartford’s largely black and Hispanic student population.”

That ruling led to a series of benchmarks that were designed to promote integration.

But according to CT Mirror story, last Friday, Governor Malloy said that “the state should not be forced to agree to make changes to increase that percentage further.”

So despite the ruling of the Connecticut Supreme Court…

Despite all the evidence the reveals the importance and benefits of reducing racial isolation…

Despite the fundamental obligation we have to Martin Luther King Jr. and the other freedom fighters that have graced our nation…

Governor Malloy has announced that HE is satisfied with the present level of racial and ethnic isolation in the Constitution State.

In fact, Malloy explained, “Let me be very clear, I don’t think failing to reach a standard is a reason to then raise the standard…I don’t have a problem with the benchmarks as they currently exist. I have a problem when people say, ‘Well you didn’t meet that benchmark, so we are going to raise it.’ That doesn’t make a whole lot of sense.”

It doesn’t make any sense to raise the benchmarks?

It doesn’t make any sense to use our public resources to promote additional voluntary initiatives to reduce racial isolation and promote desegregation?

On that fateful day in Washington D.C. in 1963, Martin Luther King Jr. said;

“When the architects of our republic wrote the magnificent words of the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence, they were signing a promissory note to which every American was to fall heir. This note was a promise that all men, yes, black men as well as white men, would be guaranteed the unalienable rights of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

It is obvious today that America has defaulted on this promissory note insofar as her citizens of color are concerned. Instead of honoring this sacred obligation, America has given the Negro people a bad check, a check which has come back marked “insufficient funds.” But we refuse to believe that the bank of justice is bankrupt. We refuse to believe that there are insufficient funds in the great vaults of opportunity of this nation. So we have come to cash this check — a check that will give us upon demand the riches of freedom and the security of justice. We have also come to this hallowed spot to remind America of the fierce urgency of now. This is no time to engage in the luxury of cooling off or to take the tranquilizing drug of gradualism. Now is the time to make real the promises of democracy. Now is the time to rise from the dark and desolate valley of segregation to the sunlit path of racial justice. Now is the time to lift our nation from the quick sands of racial injustice to the solid rock of brotherhood. Now is the time to make justice a reality for all of God’s children.”

In the face of our nation’s continued failure to fulfill that promissory note, Governor Malloy issues a press release that reads,

“(HARTFORD, CT) – Governor Dannel P. Malloy is asking residents and organizations to ring bells at 3:00 p.m. on Wednesday, August 28, as part of a nationwide commemoration of the 50th anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s renowned “I Have a Dream” speech.

“Dr. King’s message of freedom, equality and liberty resonates as strongly today as it did fifty years ago,” Governor Malloy said.  “Never before has a single speech had such a dramatic and positive impact on our nation.  Let’s honor the message of Dr. King’s speech and the many civil rights, labor and religious organizations that organized to spread his words.  Let’s not take for granted all that they fought so hard for.  Especially now, at a time when some states are pursuing new laws that constrain the fundamental right to vote, we cannot forget that the fight for equal opportunity, equal justice, and an equal voice in our democracy never ends.”

To Malloy, Malloy’s Commissioner of Education, Stefan Pryor, and the other individuals responsible for Connecticut education policy, such as State Board of Education Chairman Alan Taylor and Hartford Board of Education Chairman Matt Poland, I say shame… shame on you.

As we prepare to celebrate the 50th Anniversary of the “I Have A Dream” speech, shame on you Governor Malloy…

And shame on the rest of you policy makers for not standing up to challenge Malloy’s outrageous comments about the need to expand the Sheff initiatives.

Here is the full text of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s speech.  Instead of issuing proclamations about ringing bells, the Governor and his allies would do well to actually read it and appreciate the true meaning of its words.

I Have A Dream Speech:  September 28, 1963

I am happy to join with you today in what will go down in history as the greatest demonstration for freedom in the history of our nation.

Five score years ago, a great American, in whose symbolic shadow we stand today, signed the Emancipation Proclamation. This momentous decree came as a great beacon light of hope to millions of Negro slaves who had been seared in the flames of withering injustice. It came as a joyous daybreak to end the long night of their captivity.

But one hundred years later, the Negro still is not free. One hundred years later, the life of the Negro is still sadly crippled by the manacles of segregation and the chains of discrimination. One hundred years later, the Negro lives on a lonely island of poverty in the midst of a vast ocean of material prosperity. One hundred years later, the Negro is still languishing in the corners of American society and finds himself an exile in his own land. So we have come here today to dramatize a shameful condition.

In a sense we have come to our nation’s capital to cash a check. When the architects of our republic wrote the magnificent words of the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence, they were signing a promissory note to which every American was to fall heir. This note was a promise that all men, yes, black men as well as white men, would be guaranteed the unalienable rights of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

It is obvious today that America has defaulted on this promissory note insofar as her citizens of color are concerned. Instead of honoring this sacred obligation, America has given the Negro people a bad check, a check which has come back marked “insufficient funds.” But we refuse to believe that the bank of justice is bankrupt. We refuse to believe that there are insufficient funds in the great vaults of opportunity of this nation. So we have come to cash this check — a check that will give us upon demand the riches of freedom and the security of justice. We have also come to this hallowed spot to remind America of the fierce urgency of now. This is no time to engage in the luxury of cooling off or to take the tranquilizing drug of gradualism. Now is the time to make real the promises of democracy. Now is the time to rise from the dark and desolate valley of segregation to the sunlit path of racial justice. Now is the time to lift our nation from the quick sands of racial injustice to the solid rock of brotherhood. Now is the time to make justice a reality for all of God’s children.

It would be fatal for the nation to overlook the urgency of the moment. This sweltering summer of the Negro’s legitimate discontent will not pass until there is an invigorating autumn of freedom and equality. Nineteen sixty-three is not an end, but a beginning. Those who hope that the Negro needed to blow off steam and will now be content will have a rude awakening if the nation returns to business as usual. There will be neither rest nor tranquility in America until the Negro is granted his citizenship rights. The whirlwinds of revolt will continue to shake the foundations of our nation until the bright day of justice emerges.

But there is something that I must say to my people who stand on the warm threshold which leads into the palace of justice. In the process of gaining our rightful place we must not be guilty of wrongful deeds. Let us not seek to satisfy our thirst for freedom by drinking from the cup of bitterness and hatred.

We must forever conduct our struggle on the high plane of dignity and discipline. We must not allow our creative protest to degenerate into physical violence. Again and again we must rise to the majestic heights of meeting physical force with soul force. The marvelous new militancy which has engulfed the Negro community must not lead us to a distrust of all white people, for many of our white brothers, as evidenced by their presence here today, have come to realize that their destiny is tied up with our destiny. They have come to realize that their freedom is inextricably bound to our freedom. We cannot walk alone.

As we walk, we must make the pledge that we shall always march ahead. We cannot turn back. There are those who are asking the devotees of civil rights, “When will you be satisfied?” We can never be satisfied as long as the Negro is the victim of the unspeakable horrors of police brutality. We can never be satisfied, as long as our bodies, heavy with the fatigue of travel, cannot gain lodging in the motels of the highways and the hotels of the cities. We cannot be satisfied as long as the Negro’s basic mobility is from a smaller ghetto to a larger one. We can never be satisfied as long as our children are stripped of their selfhood and robbed of their dignity by signs stating “For Whites Only”. We cannot be satisfied as long as a Negro in Mississippi cannot vote and a Negro in New York believes he has nothing for which to vote. No, no, we are not satisfied, and we will not be satisfied until justice rolls down like waters and righteousness like a mighty stream.

I am not unmindful that some of you have come here out of great trials and tribulations. Some of you have come fresh from narrow jail cells. Some of you have come from areas where your quest for freedom left you battered by the storms of persecution and staggered by the winds of police brutality. You have been the veterans of creative suffering. Continue to work with the faith that unearned suffering is redemptive.

Go back to Mississippi, go back to Alabama, go back to South Carolina, go back to Georgia, go back to Louisiana, go back to the slums and ghettos of our northern cities, knowing that somehow this situation can and will be changed. Let us not wallow in the valley of despair.

I say to you today, my friends, so even though we face the difficulties of today and tomorrow, I still have a dream. It is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream.

I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: “We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men are created equal.”

I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave owners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood.

I have a dream that one day even the state of Mississippi, a state sweltering with the heat of injustice, sweltering with the heat of oppression, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice.

I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.

I have a dream today.

I have a dream that one day, down in Alabama, with its vicious racists, with its governor having his lips dripping with the words of interposition and nullification; one day right there in Alabama, little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls as sisters and brothers.

I have a dream today.

I have a dream that one day every valley shall be exalted, every hill and mountain shall be made low, the rough places will be made plain, and the crooked places will be made straight, and the glory of the Lord shall be revealed, and all flesh shall see it together.

This is our hope. This is the faith that I go back to the South with. With this faith we will be able to hew out of the mountain of despair a stone of hope. With this faith we will be able to transform the jangling discords of our nation into a beautiful symphony of brotherhood. With this faith we will be able to work together, to pray together, to struggle together, to go to jail together, to stand up for freedom together, knowing that we will be free one day.

This will be the day when all of God’s children will be able to sing with a new meaning, “My country, ’tis of thee, sweet land of liberty, of thee I sing. Land where my fathers died, land of the pilgrim’s pride, from every mountainside, let freedom ring.”

And if America is to be a great nation this must become true. So let freedom ring from the prodigious hilltops of New Hampshire. Let freedom ring from the mighty mountains of New York. Let freedom ring from the heightening Alleghenies of Pennsylvania!

Let freedom ring from the snowcapped Rockies of Colorado!

Let freedom ring from the curvaceous slopes of California!

But not only that; let freedom ring from Stone Mountain of Georgia!

Let freedom ring from Lookout Mountain of Tennessee!

Let freedom ring from every hill and molehill of Mississippi. From every mountainside, let freedom ring.

And when this happens, when we allow freedom to ring, when we let it ring from every village and every hamlet, from every state and every city, we will be able to speed up that day when all of God’s children, black men and white men, Jews and Gentiles, Protestants and Catholics, will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negro spiritual, “Free at last! free at last! thank God Almighty, we are free at last!”