The Time for Action is upon us

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Following a great weekend of collecting signatures for the Pelto/Murphy 2014 petition effort, we continue to ramp  up our historic effort to get on the November ballot and ensure that the people of Connecticut have a real choice in this year’s election for governor hangs in the balance…

As supporters know, the August 6th 2014 deadline to submit 7,500 signatures to get on the November Ballot is fast approaching.

Regardless of whether you’ve been collecting signatures all along or are part of the group willing to join the effort now, we need your help!

PLEASE DOWNLOAD AND PRINT OUT the Pelto/Murphy petition form and get ten to fifteen family, friends, colleagues, neighbors, and other fellow citizens to sign. 

REMEMBER:  Any voter can sign and every name moves us closer to our goal.

You can download the Pelto/Murphy 2014 Petition form by clicking on the following link – Pelto/Murphy 2014 Petition Form

Here are the Pelto/Murphy 2014 Petition Form Instructions:

#1:  This exact form must be used. No other form will do.  The form must be doubled-sided with one side to collect the signature, name, birth date and street address of each voter. If necessary, securely glue or tape the two sides together if you can’t print on both sides.

#2: There must be separate page for each town.  This means that if you are getting a signature from a voter who lives in Middletown and one who lives in Avon you must have them sign separate petition sheets – note that at the top of the page it says Petition Circulated in Town of __________.  Please put in the name of the town you are the petition signer is from.

#3: We are instructed to print the form out on legal paper – HOWEVER – if you use regular 8 ½ x 11 paper and the forms are completed correctly they will be accepted.   So you can print and copy this page on legal or regular paper BUT make sure that the final document HAS BOTH SIDES COPIED.

#4: When you have collected some signatures and want to submit them: 

(a)  Take the sheet(s) for your town to your local town clerk who will watch you sign the back, notarize it and take the sheet for that particular town.  They can also notarize the other towns you have but we will need to get those sheets to the appropriate towns.

(b)  If you have sheets for other towns and don’t have time to deliver them or can’t stop by your local town hall, you MUST still get all the sheets notarized and then send the sheets to following address – but we need them soon so we can get them to the appropriate town:

Pelto 2014
PO Box 400
Storrs, CT. 06268

If you have any questions, please drop me a note at [email protected] or call me at 860-428-2823.

Finally, we will be conducting petition drives at locations throughout the state over the next week.  If you have a couple of hours to help at one of these locations – please send us a note – as soon as possible – so we can get you scheduled to help – again the email address is [email protected]

As always,

Thanks!

Jonathan

Paid for by Pelto 2014, Ted Strelez, Treasurer, Christine Ladd, Deputy Treasurer, Approved by Jonathan Pelto

Sign a Pelto/Murphy 2014 Petition Today:  Bushnell Park – near the food trucks 11:30 – 1pm

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Looking for an opportunity to ensure that our voices are heard in this year’s gubernatorial election?

If you are in the area, swing by Bushnell Park from 11:30 to 1:00pm today (near the food trucks) and sign the petition that will allow us to be on this year’s ballot.

Thanks so much,

Jonathan Pelto and Ebony Murphy
Education and Democracy Party
 

Paid for by Pelto 2014, Ted Strelez, Treasurer, Christine Ladd, Deputy Treasurer, Approved by Jonathan Pelto

I didn’t leave my political party, my party left me

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I’m often asked why, considering I’m a life-long Democrat, I am “leaving” the Democratic Party and running as an independent for Governor.  I start by explaining that as hard as it is to run as an independent, I thought the institutional barriers to winning a Democratic Primary were even greater.

But then I add that, to be blunt,  I don’t believe I am “leaving” the Democratic Party, I believe the Democratic Party has left me and tens of thousands of other people who understand that many Democratic leaders have turned their backs on Democratic ideals, principles and constituencies in order to kowtow to the corporate elite.

Former Democratic State Senator, State Comptroller, and Democratic candidate for governor, Bill Curry has an extraordinarily powerful piece on Salon.com today about this very issue.  While I’ve had my differences with Bill Curry through the years (probably more often my fault), he is one of the smartest, most astute, political observers on the scene today. In his latest piece for this national audience, Bill Curry writes;

 My party has lost its soul: Bill Clinton, Barack Obama and the victory of Wall Street Democrats

In 2006 the Atlantic magazine asked a panel of “eminent historians” to name the 100 most influential people in American history.  Included alongside George Washington, Abe Lincoln, Mark Twain and Elvis Presley was Ralph Nader, one of only three living Americans to make the list. It was airy company for Nader, but if you think about it, an easy call. Though a private citizen, Nader shepherded more bills through Congress than all but a handful of American presidents.

If that sounds like an outsize claim, try refuting it. His signature wins included landmark laws on auto, food, consumer product and workplace safety; clean air and water; freedom of information, and consumer, citizen, worker and shareholder rights.

In a century only Woodrow Wilson, Franklin Roosevelt and Lyndon Johnson passed more major legislation. Nader’s also the only American ever to start a major social or political movement all by himself. The labor, civil rights and women’s movements all had multiple mothers and fathers, as did each generation’s peace and antiwar movements.

Not so the consumer movement, which started out as just one guy banging away at a typewriter. Soon he was a national icon, seen leaning into Senate microphones on TV or staring down the establishment from the covers of news magazines. What lifted Nader to such heights was the 1965 publication of “Unsafe at Any Speed,” an exposé of the auto industry’s sociopathic indifference to the health and safety of its customers. In little more than a year Congress put seat belts in every new car and created the forerunners of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Washington’s rapid response affirmed Nader’s belief that people provided with critical facts will demand change and that sooner than one might expect politicians, however listless or corrupt, will give it to them.

This faith in the power of ideas and of public opinion — in the educability of people and thus in the viability of democracy — distinguishes Nader from much of what remains of the American left.

[…]

Throughout the 1980s Nader watched as erstwhile Democratic allies vanished or fell into the welcoming arms of big business.  By the mid-’90s the whole country was in a swoon over the new baby-faced titans of technology and global capital. If leading Democrats thought technology threatened anyone’s privacy or employment or that globalization threatened anyone’s wages, they kept it to themselves.  In his contempt for oligarchs of any vintage and rejection of the economic and political democratization myths of the new technology Nader seemed an anachronism. His critics would later say Nader was desperate for attention.

For certain he was desperate to reengage the nation in a debate over the concentration of wealth and power; desperate enough by 1992 to run for president. His first race was a sort of novelty campaign — he ran in New Hampshire’s Democratic and Republican primaries “as a stand in for none of the above.” But the experience proved habit-forming and he got mottre serious as he went along. In 1996 and 2000 he ran as the nominee of the Green Party and in 2004 and 2008 as an independent.

The campaigns defined him for a new generation, but he never stopped writing. His latest book, “Unstoppable,” argues for the existence and utility of an “emerging left-right alliance to dismantle the corporate state.” The book is vintage Nader and ranks with his best. The questions it poses should greatly interest progressives.

The question is, will any read it. It’s a question because on top of all the hurdles facing even celebrity authors today, Nader is estranged from much of his natural readership. It goes back, of course, to his third race for president, the one that gave us George W. Bush, John Roberts, Sam Alito, the Iraq War and a colossal debt. Democrats blame Nader for all of it. Some say he not only cost Al Gore the 2000 election but did it on purpose. Nader denies both charges. Both are more debatable than either he or his critics allow. In 1996 I served as counselor to President Clinton and met often with Nader to discuss that campaign. Early on he told me he wouldn’t be a spoiler. Judging by his message and schedule and the deployment of his meager resources, he was true to his word. In 2000 his allocation of resources was little changed: He spent 20 days in deep blue California, two in Florida; hardly a spoiler’s itinerary. But he was in Florida at the end and his equation throughout of Gore with Bush — “Tweedledum and Tweedledee” — outraged Democrats.

The Democrats’ dismissal of Nader in 2000 was of a piece with our personality-driven politics: a curmudgeon on steroids; older now and grumpier; driven by ego and personal grievance. But Nader always hit hard; you don’t get to be the world’s most famous shopper by making allowances or pulling punches. The difference was that in 2000 Democrats as well as Republicans bore the brunt of his attacks. What had changed? It says a lot about the Democratic Party then and now that nobody bothered to ask the question, the answer to which is, a whole lot.

Bill Curry’s complete piece can be found at:  Bill Curry article.

I urge all of you to take the time to read it. Had we done a better job of listening to Ralph Nader and Bill Curry we very well might not be in the mess we are today.

There is no need to agree or disagree with Nader and Curry on every issue to recognize that they speak the truth about the fact that we did not leave the Democratic Party, the Democratic Party left. Us.

The question is how best to re-build a political movement that will ensure our beliefs and principles are heard and acted upon. That is one of the very reasons I am running for Governor this year.

Paid for by Pelto 2014, Ted Strelez, Treasurer, Christine Ladd, Deputy Treasurer, Approved by Jonathan Pelto

If you want change – now is the time to step up and make it happen!

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Apologies to those that have already received this call to action – but the historic effort to get on the November ballot and ensure that the people of Connecticut have a real choice in this year’s election for governor hangs in the balance…

The August 6th 2014 deadline to submit 7,500 signatures to get on the November Ballot is fast approaching.

Many people have and will continue to collect signatures – but we need everyone’s help to make sure that sufficient signatures are collected.

If you have been collecting signatures please do all you can to collect even more names.

But this is vital; If you haven’t had a chance to get some names – PLEASE DOWNLOAD AND PRINT OUT the Pelto/Murphy petition form and get ten to fifteen family, friends, colleagues, neighbors, and other fellow citizens to sign. 

REMEMBER:  Any voter can sign and every name moves us closer to our goal.

A Pelto/Murphy 2014 Petition is attached to this email and you can also download via the following link:

Pelto/Murphy 2014 Petition Form

Here are the Pelto/Murphy 2014 Petition Form Instructions:

This exact form must be used. No other form will do.  The form must be doubled-sided with one side to collect the signature, name, birth date and street address of each voter. If necessary, securely glue or tape the two sides together if you can’t print on both sides.

There must be separate page for each town.  This means that if you are getting a signature from a voter who lives in Middletown and one who lives in Avon you must have them sign separate petition sheets – note that at the top of the page it says Petition Circulated in Town of __________.  Please put in the name of the town you are the petition signer is from.

Third, we are instructed to print the form out on legal paper – HOWEVER – if you use regular 8 ½ x 11 paper and the forms are completed correctly they will be accepted.   So you can print and copy this page on legal or regular paper BUT make sure that the final document HAS BOTH SIDES COPIED.

Fourth, when you have collected some signatures and want to submit them: 

(1)  Take the sheet(s) for your town to your local town clerk who will watch you sign the back, notarize it and take the sheet for that particular town.  They can also notarize the other towns you have but we will need to get those sheets to the appropriate towns.

(2)  If you have sheets for other towns and don’t have time to deliver them or can’t stop by your local town hall, you MUST still get all the sheets notarized and then send the sheets to:

Pelto 2014
PO Box 400
Storrs, CT. 06268

 If you have any questions, please drop me a note at [email protected] or call me at 860-428-2823.

Thanks so much for all your help

Together we can change the course of Connecticut – but we need everyone to help collect more signatures

Jonathan

If you simply can’t collect signatures, but still want to sign, watch the website for locations where you can go and sign or drop me a note and we’ll see what we can do to find another way that you can sign the petition. [email protected]

Paid for by Pelto 2014, Ted Strelez, Treasurer, Christine Ladd, Deputy Treasurer, Approved by Jonathan Pelto

 

 

 

Looking for a place to sign a Pelto/Murphy 2014 Petition this weekend

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[Just back often - additional locations will be added]

Saturday July 26th

Storrs Starbucks: 10:00 – 11:00am
1244 Storrs Rd., Storrs, CT
 
Rocky Hill Starbucks 10-noon
412 Cromwell Ave, Rocky Hill, CT 
 
Naugatuck Stop and Shop 10-noon
727 Rubber Ave, Naugatuck, CT
 
New London City Pier 2:00-4:00pm
 
West Hartford Barnes & Noble: 10:30- noon
Blue Back Square, 60 Isham Road, West Hartford, CT 
 
Manchester Barnes & Noble: 12:30 – 3pm
Barnes & Noble Booksellers, 270 Buckland Hills Dr., Manchester, CT
 
Milford Barnes & Noble: 4:30 – 6pm
Barnes & Noble, 1375 Boston Post Road, Milford, CT
 
New Haven Green 4-7pm
 
Bushnell Carousel [Time TBD]
Bushnell Park, Harford, CT
 

Sunday, July 27th

Coventry Farmers Market 10:30 – 12:00
Nathan Hale Homestead, Coventry, CT
 
Stamford Farmers Market 11:00 – 1pm
39 Scofieldtown Rd, Stamford, CT
 
Cafemantic 12-2pm
948 Main St, Willimantic, CT
 
Greater Hartford Irish Music Festival [Time TBD]
132 Commerce St. Glastonbury, CT.
 
Paid for by Pelto 2014, Ted Strelez, Treasurer, Christine Ladd, Deputy Treasurer, Approved by Jonathan Pelto

What is this race for Governor all about – take a look at the new article from In These Times

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I recently conducted an interview with Cole Stangler, a reporter for “In These Times.”

Although not everyone reads “In These Times,” they should.

Kurt Vonnegut once said, “If it weren’t for In These Times, I’d be a man without a country.”

In These Times was created by author and historian James Weinstein in 1976.  His goal was to, “”identify and clarify the struggles against corporate power now multiplying in American society.”  You can read former Senator Paul Wellstone’s observation about In These Times at the end of this article.

Here is the In These Times article about the race in Connecticut;

Pelto-Murphy

Spoiler Alert, Connecticut: Jon Pelto Says He Isn’t One

Meet the blogger and former legislator who just might be incumbent Governor Dan Malloy’s worst enemy.

At first glance, Jonathan Pelto seems like another run-of-the-mill Democrat—a time-tested party loyalist. He was first elected to the Connecticut State House in 1984—his senior year at the University of Connecticut—where he served until 1993. During that time, Pelto worked as political director of the state party; after leaving the Capitol, he made a living as a high-profile liberal political consultant. In recent years, however, Pelto has explicitly concentrated his energies on reform: He has emerged as one of the state’s most prominent left-wing critics of Democratic Governor Dannel Malloy, elected in 2010.

On his highly trafficked blog “Wait What?” Pelto regularly serves up acerbic columns interrogating Malloy’s stances on a variety of subjects, including education reform, taxes, labor relations and budget cuts. “Jon Pelto,” the anti-corporate education reform crusader Diane Ravitch recently proclaimed on her own blog, “is standing up for teachers and parents and everyone else who is not in the 1%.”

On June 12, Pelto announced he was running for governor under the self-created Education and Democracy Party ticket. He and his running mate Ebony Murphy need to collect a minimum of 7,500 signatures by August 6 in order to appear on the ballot; they expect to reach that goal.

The major unions—the state AFL-CIOConnecticut’s SEIU localseven the American Federation of Teachers-Connecticut—have all endorsed the incumbent Democrat. (“I love Jon Pelto and am supporting Gov. Malloy,” tweeted AFT President Randi Weingarten last month.) The Connecticut Working Families Party is expected to follow suit when the state committee makes its final decision, which likely won’t be until August.

Speaking to In These Times on the phone last week, Pelto says he’s frustrated by the lack of official endorsements, but insists he’s committed to the campaign. This interview has been abridged and edited.

Why are you mounting a challenge to Dan Malloy?

I supported Dan Malloy. I worked with Dan Malloy. But when he was sworn in as Dannel Malloy, he reversed course on a lot of policies.

In Malloy’s first year, for example, he really went after state employees. What really changed my mind about his work, though, was when he became a huge advocate of the corporate education reform industry. He is the only Democratic governor to introduce a plan to do away with teacher tenure, which he did in February 2012. At that point, my blog really shifted to focusing on education issues and the education reform effort.

That was a key topic, although there were many others. What was clear was that Malloy had no intention of pivoting leftward on a variety of things I perceived to be major issues.

What are those issues?

The privatization of public education was number one.

Number two is tax policy. When Governor Malloy introduced a $1.5 billion tax package to balance the budget in 2011, he said to a joint session of the House and Senate that he didn’t want to raise taxes more than 0.2 percent on those making over $1 million because he didn’t want to “punish success.” The taxes he have issued have disproportionately affected the middle class. We have the highest gas tax in history; the sales tax is fairly narrow and hits a lot of people in the middle-class and working families. We’ve created a perfectly regressive tax structure.

Number three is that Malloy has pushed through the biggest cuts in Connecticut history to our public colleges and universities.

Number four, he is—for lack of a better term—a fan of these corporate welfare programs that give nearly $1 billion in state funds, either in tax breaks or low-interest loans, to major companies. The most famous of these is Bridgewater, the largest hedge fund in the world. Its CEO, Ray Dalio, was paid $3.9 billion three years ago, and made $3 billion last year. Malloy offered Bridgewater $115 million in incentives if it agreed to move to downtown Stamford. He gave ESPN $25 million for a new studio, even though the studio had already been built. He gave more than $50 million to CIGNA Corp. to move their headquarters from Pennsylvania back to Connecticut. Malloy has been a real aficionado of giving money to companies with the promise that they create jobs over the course of 10 years.

And finally, Connecticut used to have the best campaign finance law in the country. But Malloy and the Democrats have really cut back its effectiveness by creating massive loopholes that allow for lobbyists and PACs—and even state contractors—to give money to candidates.

Why not run as a Democrat like Zephyr Teachout in New York?

In Connecticut, it would have been, in my mind, impossible to win a Democratic primary.

My fear was that Malloy would win and claim that those issues were not as important, because he won by 70-30 to win the Democratic primary. Running as a third party ensures that once you get on the ballot, you get to be heard all the way through the process.

In campaign management, we look at the percentage of people who want to reelect the incumbent. The highest that Malloy’s ever gotten was 46 percent. Compare that to Andrew Cuomo, who has a 54 to 60 percent, depending on the candidate: Malloy is on the ropes anyway.

In the polls that have been conducted so far, you’re not showing up. They’ve shown a very small percentage of people chose the option of somebody other than Malloy or Foley. Do you really think you have a chance of winning this election? And if you don’t, what’s the point of running?

These questions weigh heavily on me as I’ve thought about the issues, and I have to say my answer has changed a little bit over time. I stuck with the line—“I would only run if I was a credible candidate. I wouldn’t run simply if I was a spoiler.” But credible is a relative term. The goal is to win, but it’s also to impact the debate on what it means to be a Democrat and the corporatization of government. And the best way to do that was to run as a third-party candidate.

I think I am already having an impact on the debate. I was an opponent of the Common Core, for example. The only one left in the field [of potential candidates] who still supports Common Core is Malloy. All the other candidates have pledged to do away with Common Core if they’re elected and that has happened, in part, because of my positioning in the debate.

The idea of a credible candidate is one that can have an impact, and I believe that we are and we will have a significant impact on the race.

Do you think you can win this race?

I think there is a scenario, an outside chance, particularly in a four-way race. This guy Joe Visconti is also collecting petitions [to run for governor]. [In 1990], Lowell Weicker won with 40 percent of the vote as an independent candidate for governor. It was different; he was well-known and well-financed. And coming from the Republican side, John Rowland became governor in 1994 with 36 percent of the vote. Is there a scenario where I can get 35 or 36 percent of the vote? Yes, I think there is.

You’re regarded as something of a spoiler candidate. The former Senator Joseph Lieberman has compared you to Ralph Nader. The political director of the eastern states conference of Machinists made the same case—that you’re a spoiler siphoning off votes from the Democrats. The alternative to Dan Malloy is Tom Foley, who is this viciously right-wing hedge fund guy, who’s made no secret of his admiration for the policies of Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker. What do you make of those spoiler charges?

I have two different but parallel responses, the first is that this is not Wisconsin.

So Tom Foley famously said Connecticut needs a “Wisconsin moment.”

Yeah, we don’t know much about Foley. He’s not a Teabagger. On the other hand, he said that.

But more importantly, thanks to gerrymandering in 1990, 2000, and 2010, Connecticut will remain Democratic for generations to come, so there will be a Democratic legislature—unlike in Wisconsin where you had a [Tea Party] governor and [Tea Party]-controlled House and Senate. Here we will have a Democratic legislature. And it did its job. For example, when Malloy introduced a bill that did away with tenure, the Democratic legislature stripped it of that provision. The idea that Foley would make Connecticut the next Wisconsin is just fearmongering and just not true.

Now, would Foley be worse than Malloy on some issues? Undoubtedly he would. But on education, I don’t think we could get much worse than Malloy. He is anathema to everything we Democrats, liberals, and progressives [stand for].

The fact is that Dan Malloy, at any point, could have addressed the concerns of educators and the middle-class people who are against corporate welfare and he chose not to. It’s not like these are issues that they would agree with him on—it’s just that the union leadership has said, “Suck it up and vote for him because the alternative is worse.” My feeling is that if there is a spoiler in this, it’s Dan Malloy for not being willing to come to the base of the Democratic Party and the people of Connecticut and address their concerns.

The Education and Democracy Party you are running with, is that a vehicle that will last beyond this campaign? Do you see this as building any long-term political power or is it just focused on this one campaign?

I think that’s yet to be seen. Watching the Democratic Party, I’m convinced that big segments of it have moved away from its base. Here in Connecticut, the leadership of the Democratic Party is not speaking out about representing the middle class, it’s not speaking out for teachers and higher education; it’s so aligned with corporate interests.

If this battle ends up with the Democratic Party retrenching into its own corporate approach, then I’d see the Education and Democracy Party as a long-term effort to provide an alternative to the Democratic Party or to elements within it. I’m not opposed at all to using this as a vehicle towards long-term change.

Let’s say you get 5 percent of the vote, or something that’s greater than the margin of victory for Tom Foley and Malloy loses. Is there a certain amount of success in something like that, where you’re sending a message to Democratic leadership? Do you see that as a positive thing?

I wouldn’t be running if I wasn’t comfortable with the fact that that might be an outcome. I feel strongly enough about these issues. After campaigning and talking to many people, lots of other people feel strongly as well.

While I’d like to do more than that—get more than 4 or 5 percent of the vote—and I certainly do not want to throw the election to a Republican, I feel comfortable with that outcome. I feel comfortable that I will be able to impact the system and impact the debate in a positive way, regardless of whether I win or not.

Read the entire article at: http://inthesetimes.com/article/16997/jon_pelto_dan_malloy_governor_connecticut

Cole Stangler is an In These Times staff writer and Schumann Fellow based in Washington D.C., covering labor, trade, foreign policy and environmental issues. His reporting has appeared in The Huffington Post and The American Prospect, and has been cited in The New York Times.

Finally, as for In These Times, “The late Sen. Paul Wellstone, one of the first subscribers to In These Times, put it this way: ‘Meaningful democracy cannot survive without the free flow of information, even (or especially) when that information threatens the privileged and the powerful. At a time of growing media concentration, In These Times is an invaluable source of news and information that the corporate media would too often prefer to ignore.’”

Paid for by Pelto 2014, Ted Strelez, Treasurer, Christine Ladd, Deputy Treasurer, Approved by Jonathan Pelto

A call for action – A request for help

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Whether the voters of Connecticut get the option of voting for a candidate other than Dannel “Dan” Malloy or Tom Foley/John McKinney depends on whether we collect a sufficient number of signatures by the August 6th 2014 Deadline to get on the November Ballot!

We have less than two weeks to reach our goal and ensure the people of Connecticut have a real choice in this year’s election.

Here is the link to download the petition:  Pelto/Murphy 2014 Petition Form

While we’ve made great progress toward the goal of collecting 7,500 signatures, additional names are needed to ensure that we end up with a sufficient number to get on the ballot.

If you’ve been collecting signatures – please continue to do all you can to collect even more names.

And if you haven’t had a chance to help with the petition effort yet, please download and print out a Pelto/Murphy petition form and use the next 14 days to get family, friends, colleagues, neighbors, and others to sign. 

REMEMBER:  Any voter can sign and every name moves us closer to our goal.

Here is the link to download the petition:  Pelto/Murphy 2014 Petition Form

If you can’t download the form, email me at [email protected] and we’ll email you a pdf or send you a hard copy…but time is running out.

Also, here is the Pelto/Murphy 2014 Petition Form Instructions;

This exact form must be used. No other form will do.  The form must be doubled-sided with one side to collect the signature, name, birth date and street address of each voter.  If you can’t print double sided then securely glue or tape the two sides together.

There must be separate page for each town.  This means if you are getting a signature from a voter who lives in Middletown and one who lives in Avon you must have them sign separate petition sheets – note that at the top of the page it says Petition Circulated in Town of ________.

Third, we are instructed to print the form out on legal paper – HOWEVER – if you use regular 8 ½ x 11 paper and the forms are completed correctly they will be accepted.   So you can print and copy this page on legal or regular paper BUT make sure that the final document HAS BOTH SIDES COPIED.

Fourth, when you have collected some signatures and want to submit them: 

(1)  Take the sheet(s) to your local town clerk who will watch you sign the back, notarize it and take the sheet for that particular town.  They can also notarize the other towns you have but we will need to get them to those other towns.

(2)  If you have sheets for other towns and don’t have time to deliver them to those downs (or can’t stop by your local town hall), you MUST still get them notarized and then send the sheets to the following address and we’ll have them delivered to the appropriate town clerk.

Pelto 2014
PO Box 400
Storrs, CT. 06268

 

If you have any questions, please drop me a note at [email protected] or call me at 860-428-2823.

Thanks so much for all your help

Jonathan

Paid for by Pelto 2014, Ted Strelez, Treasurer, Christine Ladd, Deputy Treasurer, Approved by Jonathan Pelto

And from the Wall Street Journal – Spoiler Fears on Left in Connecticut Governor Race

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In a story entitled, Spoiler Fears on Left in Connecticut Governor Race – Jonathan Pelto’s Campaign Poses Risks for Gov. Dannel Malloy, the Wall Street Journal’s Jospeh De Avila writes,

Some Republicans argue a conservative third-party candidate cost GOP nominee Tom Foley the governorship of Connecticut in the 2010 election.

This year, a liberal third-party candidate has emerged, raising questions about the impact on Democratic Gov. Dannel Malloy’s re-election plans for the fall.

Mr. Foley, a Greenwich businessman, is once again the GOP front-runner, leading his opponent in the Republican primary scheduled for Aug. 12. Mr. Malloy is the unchallenged Democratic nominee.

The men fought a close battle four years ago. Mr. Malloy received 49.5% of the vote and Mr. Foley 48.9%, with Mr. Malloy winning by about 6,400 votes. Conservative candidate Thomas Marsh garnered about 17,600 votes, roughly 1.5% of the total—enough to have given the victory to Mr. Foley.

So far this year, Messrs. Malloy and Foley are virtually tied in the polls.

Now, though, Jonathan Pelto has entered the picture. The former state representative and onetime Democratic Party star began submitting petitions earlier this month that would let him mount a third-party general-election bid.

Wall Street Journal

While Mr. Pelto’s campaign faces steep challenges, political observers said if he siphons off even a relatively small number of voters from Mr. Malloy, the governor could be in trouble.

“Malloy has to be concerned,” said Gary Rose, chairman of the Department of Government and Politics at Sacred Heart University in Fairfield, Conn. “It’s obviously his base that [Mr. Pelto] can eat into.”

Conservative political activist Joe Visconti also is collecting signatures to run as a third-party candidate, although he is even less well known than Mr. Pelto.

Mr. Pelto formed the Education and Democracy Party for his run and has focused his candidacy on a critique of Mr. Malloy’s education policies. He welcomes the possibility that his candidacy could help elect a Republican.

“That would send a very powerful message to Connecticut Democrats and Democrats across the country—that you can’t walk away from these constituents and not have significant repercussions,” said Mr. Pelto, 53 years old. “Democrats across the country will have to recognize that one of the reasons he lost is because he walked away from public education.”

Jon Blair, campaign manager for the Malloy campaign, declined to comment on Mr. Pelto.

Mr. Pelto said he had collected the 7,500 signatures required by the state to get his name on the ballot. He has continued collecting additional signatures as a buffer, in case election officials reject any names in the certification process, which could take weeks.

Mr. Pelto’s criticism of the governor’s educational policies has its roots in a February 2012 speech where Mr. Malloy proposed tightening teacher tenure policies. Mr. Malloy also outlined changes to teacher evaluations and adding charter schools. The state Legislature later passed a compromise education bill.

In June, Mr. Malloy defended his record in a rare public statement addressing Mr. Pelto. He pointed to the state’s expansion of prekindergarten programs this spring and improvement in high-school graduation rates.

“I don’t need to respond to what Jonathan says,” Mr. Malloy said then. “I’m more than happy to have my record in education measured by results.”

The state’s major labor unions are supporting Mr. Malloy. The governor established collective-bargaining rights for personal-care attendants, raised the minimum wage twice and enacted the nation’s first paid-sick leave law, said Lori Pelletier, executive secretary treasurer of Connecticut AFL-CIO.

While labor-union leaders back Mr. Malloy, rank-and-file members are unsatisfied with him, Mr. Pelto said. “Their level of anger is high,” he said.

Some political observers said Mr. Pelto isn’t guaranteed to have an impact on the race. He lacks financial resources and name recognition, and his message is tailored to government employees, said Scott McLean, professor of political science at Quinnipiac University.

Mr. Malloy also has the advantage of being in office this time around.

“It’s just so rare to see an election that close with an incumbent,” Mr. McLean said.

Mr. Pelto was elected to the state House of Representatives at age 23 in 1984 and ran Gary Hart’s presidential primary campaign in Connecticut that year. He also helped run Democratic Gov. William O’Neill’s successful re-election bid in 1986.

His relationship with party leaders eventually turned frosty, though. He was fired in 1992 after six years as state Democrats’ political director. He resigned in 1993 from the House.

Mr. Pelto eventually established a political consulting firm. In 2011, he began writing a blog that has mainly focused on criticism of Mr. Malloy’s education policies.

Mr. Malloy’s supporters said Mr. Pelto’s bid is fueled by personal animosity toward the governor and his circle of advisers.

“I do think he has an ax to grind,” Ms. Pelletier said. “Running for governor is not about revenge.”

Mr. Pelto said his campaign isn’t personal.

“Grow up,” Mr. Pelto said. “Let’s have a debate about the issues.”

For the full article go to: http://online.wsj.com/articles/spoiler-fears-on-left-in-connecticut-governor-race-1405905844

Photo  by Kevin Hagen for The Wall Street Journal

Paid for by Pelto 2014, Ted Strelez, Treasurer, Christine Ladd, Deputy Treasurer, Approved by Jonathan Pelto

We Need Your Help as we head for the August 6th Pelto/Murphy 2014 Petition Deadline

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Friends,

We know Connecticut needs new leadership…

And we know we can provide our citizens and our state with the leadership our state needs and deserves

But to get there we need your help to make sure that we are on the November ballot.

Many of you are already deeply involved in the effort to collect petitions, but we’re reaching out to new people and touching base with those of you who are already because we need everyone’s help.

While we are making good progress with the petition process, we still have a ways to go to ensure that we 7,500 “good” signatures of Connecticut voters. We really need about 10,000 signatures to make sure we have a sufficient buffer in case names are disallowed.

Click here to Download the Pelto/Murphy 2014 Petition:

The deadline is in less than three weeks – August 6, 2014 at 4pm.

For those of you who have been collecting names – PLEASE RE-DOUBLE your efforts…

If you haven’t had a chance to collect names, please download the petition form and do whatever you can to collect some signatures from Connecticut voters.

Click here to Download the Pelto/Murphy 2014 Petition:

Even 10 to 15 more names will make a big difference as we work to make sure that we have the signatures and the buffer we need to qualify for a position on the ballot.

As many of you already know, the petition form is double sided – one side for the signatures, the other side for the certification process. If you can’t find a way to print out a double sided sheet then tape or glue the two sides securely together securely to make sure it is truly one page/double sided.

Once you have the petition form then please get your family, friends, neighbors, co-workers and others to sign.

Ask at the coffee shop, the farmer’s market, the grocery store and at local events.

If you get signatures from more than one town – REMEMBER – each town must be on a separate page.

Since the deadline is near, when you have collected some signatures – IN YOUR TOWN – simply deliver the petitions directly to your Town Clerk’s Office. The town clerk can notarize the forms as required. (If you have a chance, please send us a quick email as to the number you signatures you dropped off. Send your note to [email protected]

If you have signatures from other towns and can’t get to that town clerk (or if getting to your clerk’s office is difficult), then just send the notarized petitions to us at the following address and we’ll get them to the appropriate town clerk before August 6th;

Pelto 2014
PO Box 400
Storrs, CT. 06268

Supporters are reporting that they are having a lot of luck collecting names by simply telling voters – “I’m collecting signatures to get Jonathan Pelto and the new Education Party on the ballot for Governor so that voters have more choices. Your signature doesn’t commit you to voting for them, it only allows us to have a choice other than Malloy and Foley when we vote for governor this year.”

REMEMBER – ANY CONNECTICUGT VOTER CAN SIGN THE PETITION.

Here are the general instructions about the petitions;

This exact form must be used. No other form will do. The form must be doubled-sided with one side to collect the signature, name, birth date and street address of each voter. The other side is for the person collecting the signatures to sign – AFTER YOU HAVE COLLECTED THE SIGNATURES – you need to get the town clerk, notary, attorney or justice of the peace to watch you sign the certification of the form.

Again – Click here to Download the Pelto/Murphy 2014 Petition:

There must be separate page for each town. This means if you are getting a signature from a voter who lives in Middletown and one who lives in Avon you must have them sign separate petition sheets – note that at the top of the page it says Petition Circulated in Town of __________.

Third, we are instructed to print the form out on legal paper – HOWEVER – if you use regular 8 ½ x 11 paper and the forms are completed correctly they will be accepted. So you can print and copy this page on legal or regular paper BUT make sure that the final document HAS BOTH SIDES COPIED… if you can’t print out double sided blue or tape the form securely so it is truly double sided.

Fourth, when you have collected some signatures and want to submit them:

Take the sheet(s) for your local town clerk who will watch you sign the back, notarize it and take the sheet for that particular town. They can also notarize the other towns you have but we will need to get them to those other towns.

If you have sheets for other towns and don’t have time to deliver them or can’t stop by your local town hall, you MUST still get them notarized and then send the sheets to:

Pelto 2014
PO Box 400
Storrs, CT. 06268

If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to email me at [email protected] or call or text me at 860-428-2823.

Again, thank you so much for your help!

In less than three weeks we’ll have earned our place on the ballot and can proceed with our campaign to change the course of Connecticut.

But to get there, your participation is absolutely critical!

Please take the time to collect some signatures so we can safely qualify for a position on the November ballot.

Jonathan

Please drop me a note if you are willing to take on this additional task at [email protected]

Paid for by Pelto 2014, Ted Strelez, Treasurer, Christine Ladd, Deputy Treasurer, Approved by Jonathan Pelto

Great Profile Piece in Reminder News – Jon Pelto and Ebony Murphy petition to run for governor

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rnw-wm-hc-pelto-murphy-0704-1-jpg-20140706

From the Reminder News, written by Melanie Savage

 

Jon Pelto and Ebony Murphy petition to run for governor

After months of careful consideration, Mansfield resident Jonathan Pelto recently made the decision to choose a running mate and then petition to be included on the ballot for the upcoming election for governor of the state of Connecticut.

Pelto has been actively involved in Connecticut public policy, advocacy and electoral politics for nearly 40 years. In 1981, he was elected the youngest Democratic town chairman in Connecticut history, beating out Sam Gejdenson, who Pelto had worked for from 1979 through 1980. In 1984, he was elected to the Connecticut House of Representatives and, over five terms, rose to the level of Deputy Majority Leader. He was a long-time member of the Appropriations Committee and Education Committee.

Pelto served as a pro-income tax point person during the historic 1991 legislative session, but was primarily recognized for his expertise in education policy. He helped write the Educational Enhancement Act and the Education Cost Sharing Formula and worked on a number of the other major education issues during the 1980s and 1990s.

After leaving the Legislature, Pelto ran a successful strategic communications company, helping associations, organizations, unions and American Indian tribes with public relations, media relations and advocacy programs aimed at educating, persuading and mobilizing targeted audiences. Through the years, he has been very involved in political campaigns serving as campaign manager or in a senior campaign position on the national, state and local levels. In 1984, Pelto managed Gary Hart’s successful presidential primary campaign in Connecticut and served as a political director in Gov. Bill O’Neill’s successful 1986 gubernatorial campaign. He also served as the political director for Connecticut’s Democratic Party from 1986-1992.

Since 2010, Pelto has served as an advocate and investigative journalist, writing for his blog, “Wait, What?” (www.jonathanpelto.com.).

Pelto’s decision to enter the race was prompted by a number of factors. “Connecticut’s political system is broken, and like the government in Washington, D.C., the leadership of Connecticut state government has lost touch with our citizens and the real problems that our people face,” he said. “The result is Connecticut is headed in the wrong direction and there is no sign that Gov. Malloy or the likely Republican candidate for governor, Tom Foley, is willing or able to put Connecticut back on track.”

Chief among Pelto’s concerns is Malloy’s handling of public education. “Gov. Malloy has earned the title of the most anti-teacher, anti-public education Democratic governor in the nation by proposing to do away with teacher tenure and repealing collective bargaining for certain groups of teachers,” he said. Malloy’s support for the Common Core and the associated testing scheme “is undermining our public education system,” said Pelto. And, said Pelto, Malloy “is engaged in an unprecedented effort to take away the local control of schools and turn them over to private corporations.”

“Malloy’s use of budget gimmicks and regressive tax policies means Connecticut is facing a $1.3 billion dollar deficit next year,” continued Pelto. While Malloy emphasized shared sacrifice, Pelto said that, “by refusing to increase the income tax rate on those making more than $1 million a year he has overburdened the middle class and property taxpayers while coddling the rich.”

Malloy’s economic development program “has been little more than giving scarce public funds to successful multi-million dollar corporations, rather than deal with the real barriers of job creation – overly high energy costs, inadequate transportation systems and a lack of appropriate job training programs,” added Pelto.

Pelto feels that his experience in politics will serve him well as governor. And having been “out in the real world for the past 20 years raising a family, running small businesses and trying to make ends meet, I truly understand the challenges we face,” he said.

There are many changes that need to be made to put Connecticut back on track, said Pelto. At the top of the list are several, including an open and honest budget and legislative process that allows all citizens a voice in their government. Connecticut needs to put an end to the dangerous anti-teacher, anti-public education “corporate education reform industry” initiatives that are undermining our public schools, said Pelto, “including repealing the Common Core and the massive, expensive, unfair and inappropriate Common Core Testing scheme.”

The development of a fair tax policy that reduces the burden on middle class families and local property taxpayers and ensures that the wealthiest residents start paying their fair share is a top priority, said Pelto, as is an end to Malloy’s record funding cuts to Connecticut’s public colleges and universities. “This is simply increasing the cost to students and their families and serves as yet another unfair tax, while limiting accesses for many of our young people who want and need some college level work to successfully compete for a job in the market place,” he said.

Pelto would put an end to Malloy’s “Corporate Welfare” program that gives big companies tens of millions, he said. Instead, he would use some of those funds to actually create jobs, for example, by funding an initiative to ensure that every public school has enough instructional assistants to help teachers support those students who need extra help. He would also strengthen the role of the government watchdog agencies, so that when state officials or state employees fail to fulfil their legal duties, they are caught and held accountable for their actions.

Ebony Murphy calls herself a “local girl.” She lived in Stamford until she was 15, then her family moved to Manchester for her Dad’s work. She was a three-time state champion in class track her senior spring at East Catholic. Murphy’s mom passed away from breast cancer at age 39 at the end of her daughter’s senior year. “I would say the toughest weeks of my life were attending my mother’s funeral, my senior prom, and then my graduation on three consecutive Fridays,” she said.

Murphy majored in English and African American Studies at UConn. She worked at the UConn Co-op and hosted a popular poetry open mike sponsored by the Creative Writing Program for her work study. “I had amazing teachers,” said Murphy, citing Gina Barreca, then state poet laureate Marilyn Nelson, poet and Vietnam memoirist Doug Anderson, and American history scholar Jeff Ogbar.

In 2005, Murphy taught an Upward Bound summer English class and then began teaching GED to pregnant and parenting teens four days a week and folding t-shirts at The GAP. She then worked in a DCF-funded group home run by a community-serving organization in Middletown. In 2008, she bought an apartment in the Asylum Hill section of Hartford and began working at Watkinson School teaching middle school English. “I finished my MA in curriculum and instruction from Uconn in 2010, and that year I married Jon Root, the son and brother of teachers,” said Murphy. Murphy was on the steering committee in the Young Women’s Leadership Program, now dismantled, and under the auspices of the Permanent Commission on the Status of Women (PCSW) Last summer, she taught a class for the Charter Oak Cultural Center’s BOTS Center for Creative Learning, which serves some of Hartford’s homeless community. “I saw firsthand what happens when our society gives up on folks or forces them into the margins,” she said.

“Several people have asked me how I can really be pro public education when I have mostly worked outside the sphere,” said Murphy. “I truly believe that there are a wealth of education models that can work, but that pop-up charters run by folks with minimal classroom experience are not the ideal. I have seen up close and personal that when tremendous resources are dedicated to a student, and when all the adults conspire to get a kid where he or she needs to be, not based on some test score, but based on who the kid is, that overwhelmingly kids flourish.”

In 2012 Murphy received a generous scholarship from CT-NOW to attend the Women’s Campaign School at Yale. She was also accepted to Central’s EdD program in Education Leadership in 2013, but had to decline the offer when she got a job at Calhoun, a progressive school with a mission that makes education student-focused “It is expensive, yes, and I believe quality education cannot be done on the cheap,” said Murphy. “Bill Gates and President Obama, too, know that a quality, non-standardized education cannot be done on the cheap, as they send their kids to Lakeside School and Sidwell Friends, where the students are not subject to the Common Core or standardized tests besides the SAT,” said Murphy.

“Jon and I are running because we are both Connecticut-bred progressives, real ones, who are concerned that working and middle class families like the ones we grew up in are struggling,” said Murphy. Corporate welfare abounds, said Murphy, citing the Rock Cats asking Hartford taxpayers to build a $60 million stadium. Charter-school management companies circle like vultures, said Murphy. “Teachers feel betrayed. Public workers, the backbone of the working and middle classes, are being slandered and blamed,” she added. “Gov. Malloy is ignoring the will of the people on so many issues that the tone deafness galls. Now is the time to send a loud message that regular people should have a say in how government operates.”

You can read the full profile at: http://www.courant.com/reminder-news/windham-edition/rnw-hc-wm-pelto-and-murphy-0704-20140704,0,701982.story

Photo curtesy of Melanie Savage

Paid for by Pelto 2014, Ted Strelez, Treasurer, Christine Ladd, Deputy Treasurer, Approved by Jonathan Pelto

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