Wait, What? Just who is Capital Prep Principal Steve Perry calling “insane?”

When the Hartford Board of Education meets tonight in executive session, they can add one more of Steve Perry’s recent tweets to the laundry list of issues to be discussed.

Dr. Steve [email protected] Tweeted;

“Union bullied pols are the reason your kids are on a waiting list. Add to their fear insane bloggers & tweeters & 100,000s wait.”

Bullied politicians?

Insane bloggers?

And this was before today’s blog about another teacher stepping forward to tell his story!

Since he opened his Twitter account, Steve Perry has sent out more than 37,500 Tweets.  Many of those were sent during school hours.

Perry has sent out hundreds of his Tweets attacking teachers, unions and anyone who opposes his personal political agenda.  At last count he had called Diane Ravitch, the nation’s leading pro-public school advocate, a racist at least 49 times.

Hundreds more of Perry’s Tweets are intended to promote his private business, where he goes around speaking to groups about his “no-nonsense education reform” proposals.

Even the most conservative estimate of the number of Perry’s work-time Tweets means that Connecticut and Hartford taxpayers have paid Perry well over $10,000 for the time he was supposed to be working, but was spending his time Tweeting instead.

Despite state laws and municipal policies that prohibit public employees from conducting private business while on public time and Hartford Board of Education policies that require appropriate behavior by the school system’s administrators, teachers and staff, Capital Prep Principal Steve Perry seems to believe that the laws and rules that apply to everyone else don’t apply to him.

Next time Steve Perry engages in one of his Twitter rants perhaps he’d be specific about just which politicians he thinks are being bullied by unions and which bloggers are insane?

  • Kerri

    Anyone want to play the Steve Perry Logical Fallacy Drinking Game?
    Ad hominem attacks? drink!
    Red herrings? drink!
    (This comment is not promoting alcohol consumption. In fact, with this drinking game, it would be dangerous to do so. Stick with water or juice.)

    • jonpelto

      You put the warning at the end of the comment… I had already downed two drinks before I read it.

  • Linda174

    Steve and/or anyone with a truthy moniker. Please utilize CCS close reading skills here:

    In Freudian psychology, displacement (German Verschiebung, ‘shift’ or ‘move’) is an unconscious defense mechanism whereby the mind substitutes either a new aim or a new object for goals felt in their original form to be dangerous or unacceptable.[1]

    A term originating with Sigmund Freud,[2] displacement operates in the mind unconsciously, its transference of emotions, ideas, or wishes being most often used to allay anxiety in the face of aggressive or sexual impulses.

  • Wayne

    Say it ain’t so, Steve!

  • Andrea Wilson

    OK I get it– you have issues with Steve Perry– I can’t say I know exactly what is going on– what I do know is our country is not doing well compared to other nations in literacy, math, and science. In fact we’re don’t even make the top 20–never mind 10- see here: http://rankingamerica.files.wordpress.com/2013/12/preview-of-e2809chigh-school-literacy-score-xlsxe2809d.jpg So please help me to understand– what is the answer?

    • Andrea Wilson

      Or more recently and probably more accurately from NPR “The U.S. was slotted between the Slovak Republic and Lithuania in the overall results, two spots behind Russia. But the PISA assessment notes that there are few statistical differences between the scores of the U.S. and those countries.” Is this what we really want? Just saying. http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2013/12/03/248329823/u-s-high-school-students-slide-in-math-reading-science

      • Andrea Wilson

        Finally– here is the breakdown and we ought to be embarassed at least I think so. While we are upset at one school which if what the site says is true– has most of their students accepted into 4 year colleges. I am not stating there is not a problem– I am saying there are serious problems we KNOW exist and threaten the future of all American children and we need to address this. Again- I am not certain how but I went to the website of Diane Ravitch whom you mentioned above and she claims there is not a problem with our education system in this country– I don’t know if she is a racist but she clearly is a deniest. Here is a link to the facts: http://www.oecd.org/pisa/keyfindings/PISA-2012-results-US.pdf

        • Sleepless in Bridgeport

          So what does any of this have anything to do with Steve Perry breaking the law? If a teacher or administrator in a public school in CT did any of the so called discipline that Perry brags and tweets about they would be fired before the sun came up the next day. And that is exactly what the Hartford BOE should do to Stevie Wonder, but they won’t because he is a “celebrity”…..you know like Justin Bieber, or Bernie Madoff, or John Rowland, or Steve Cohen, or OJ Simpson. No laws for the big shots.

        • Sleepless in Bridgeport

          How stupid am I. Andrea’s planned presentation is simply foreplay for the meeting in Hartford tonight where Stevie Wonder will receive his discipline. $20 says it will be a “Letter of Warning” that he really shouldda not done those bad things and don’t ever do that again. New how many schools would you like to ply your magic on. It’s only the public’s money in a state that is going bankrupt.

        • Andrea Wilson

          Apparently Sleepless, you did not read my other post where I address the assault on my grandson– Sorry no comparison and the fact is the teachers have a strong enough union so they seldom receive discipline. I don’t claim to know what they will or will not do in Hartford– however I DO KNOW THIS- my grandchildren did better- were treated better and had their parents involved in their education at Park City Prep than they ever were in the public schools they attended in Bridgeport.

        • R.L.

          “teachers have a strong enough union so they seldom receive discipline” You’ve got a warped sense of reality. I read your other post about the assault on your grandson. One incident does not make the norm.

        • Andrea Wilson

          RL that one incident never should have happened and you minimizing it is deplorable and is a great example why public school teachers or those defending them fail to get it! He never had a problem at Park City Prep and being abused and/or assaulted. He was still the same child going in– but hating school. after dealing with the teachers at the charter school leaned to enjoy school. Just because teachers don’t want to be accountable does not mean they should have a pass! Besides– where the heck were your complaints when they privatized the people who clean the schools and the security there– oh I forgot– as mentioned above they live in poverty so maybe because some of you feel they are less it is ok to treat them so?

        • R.L.

          So I guess your argument is that charter school teachers want to be accountable but regular public school teachers don’t. Your logic also suggests that when an individual teacher in an individual school does something unacceptable, it’s those damn strong unions keeping those droves of public school teachers from being held to task. Yet, when Strap Up Steve Perry runs an institution based on shame and bullying, it’s a viable model that should be replicated in order to raise the holy test scores of America’s schoolchildren.

        • Andrea Wilson

          I’m saying:most Charter School teachers appear to me to want to teach and most union teachers in public schools seem to the have the children in the cities down the list someplace close to the bottom and far ahead on the list for a nice place in Greenwich ., West Hartford or any other homogeneous place to work. I’m stating the unions cherry pick who.they protect and those protected are not always worthy of protection due to being bullies themselves. Help me understand what you call bullying– and then tell me how you refer to the children in your class you find distasteful and the names you call them (even when you are not around them they really do know how you feel– the kids I knew certainly did!). Perhaps spending more energy on being a good teacher and loving what you do is the cure to this whole problem? And where are the parents on this issue– you know, the ones who take part in the education of their children by spending time in the charter school– I’d love to hear from them.

        • ReTired

          Unions don’t cherry pick those they want to defend! Administrators do. And BTW, you need to read up on the Fair Dismissal statute.

        • Andrea Wilson

          Dream on– you really have no idea how they work the system. SEBAC and all their members have done a lot of wrong and for all of it- state employees took the hit and got the blame for the budget! And if you worked or work for the state then this involves the state department of labor– and as you have learned all administrative appeals have to be addressed first. I know of a woman who after an auditor investigated was found to have done no wrong and then received 10 days suspension without pay. In her case— the union railroaded her and the only justice she got was managing to keep the report in her file because a judge ruled the employer could do as they wished. Want a copy of the case? If so I can get you the Pacer link and you need to register but unless there is not more than I think- 20 pages there is no cost.

        • ReTired

          My point of reference is for public school educators, not state employees. Rules change for them in some respects.

        • R.L.

          “you did not read my other post” Uh-Oh. Now you’re starting to sound like MsIvy. I was wondering where she’s been.

        • MsIvy

          I am right here and have been monitoring these conversations. I stopped posting because I find it unnecessary to continue the dialogue because a. There is nothing new added to the conversation. Its the same convo about Steve Perry’s tweet while not a lot of focus on why kids are failing throughout the district and b. You all are hypocrites. You try to take down anyone who doesn’t agree with your witch hunt tactics yet you criticize Steve Perry for the same antics (disagree and off with your head!). Some of you have reduced yourselves to shameful name calling, racist slurs and unfounded comparisons (Oj???). So I don’t see this blog as being very productive or worthy of my thoughts.

        • Andrea Wilson

          I am interested in your background and/or if you are involved in the school and am curious about how people involved with the school in a positive light feel about the topics mentioned here. I know from experience that there are always 3 sides to a story– yours, mine and the truth (and trying to figure it out). In all honesty, after presenting Jonathan and others with real proof on issues– I find I wonder why all this fixation on this issue– which is why I am bothering right now.

        • MsIvy

          I am a citizen of this city who follows the education reform movement. From my perspective, there are legitimate complaints about Steve Perrys dealings at the school. My issue with this blog is that there seems to be singular focus on this one school and man despite (and I don’t know if they are 100% accurate) the school seems to one one of the better performing schools in the district. No, I don’t work for the school system, but I do believe that drastic reform is needed. I am not for bashing “good” teachers nor am I a die hard Steve Perry fan, but I do support some forms of privitazation, accountability and choice. I’d be more interested in hearing those who are opposed to reform offer their perspective on solutions. Yet, they never offer them outside of suggesting that we should take down the governor, the commissioner and Steve Perry. And that privatization is only there to line someone’s pockets. They give no thought to wanting creative approaches to education, accountability, etc that lie outside of the red tape associated with traditional education systems.

        • Andrea Wilson

          Thanks for the information- it’s nice to read something which seems objective. Jonathan did start out like this and I am not certain exactly what happened to him in regard to the anger which seems present here– but in the past I have found him to be a voice of reason and he has never, ever treated me in a disrespectful or negative manner so I keep wondering about the issue with Steve Perry. Thanks again.

        • Lady in Black

          Andrea, I respect your position and I think you have a valid viewpoint. I don’t think anyone should be called names or disrespected. With that said, I have personal experience with Steve Perry. I was once a fan of his and thought he could really effect some change in a school district that desperately needs it.

          However, I do not think that Steve Perry is the answer. I don’t subscribe to the camp that says doing something is better than nothing.

          In my opinion, again based on personal experience, Steve is a con man who lies and will do anything to win. I have no ax to grind against Steve personally – however I know the type of man he is and feel I need to tell you that the reason why people feel so strongly against him is legitimate. He is very dangerous to children and should not be in charge of any schools.

        • Ed Harris

          Facts like Asian Americans and white Americans score near the top on these internationale tests?

        • Andrea Wilson

          Humm I am not going to even guess what you are saying there Ed.

        • Ed Harris

          Disappointing that you find a fact something not to consider.
          Look at this:
          Average scores, Grade 4 math, 2011 TIMSS
          United States, Asian-American students: 583
          United States, white students: 559
          Finland, all students: 545
          United States, all students: 541
          United States, Hispanic students: 520
          United States, black students: 489

          Average scores, Grade 8 math, 2011 TIMSS
          United States, Asian-American students: 568
          United States, white students: 530
          Finland, all students: 514
          United States, all students: 509
          United States, Hispanic students: 485
          United States, black students: 465

        • Ed Harris

          This is not international, but did yo know this:

          Average NAEP scores, Grade 8 math, black students
          2000: 243
          2013: 263

        • Ed Harris

          or this:

          Average scores by American students, PISA science, 2006 versus 2012
          White students: 523/528
          Black students: 409/439
          Hispanic students: 439/462
          Asian-American students: 499/546
          All American students: 489/497

        • Ed Harris

          And this:

          Average scores, PISA reading, 2009:
          [United States, Asian-American students 541]
          Korea 539
          Finland 536
          [United States, white students 525]
          Canada 524
          New Zealand 521
          Japan 520
          Australia 515
          The Netherlands 508
          Belgium 506
          Norway 503
          Estonia 501
          Switzerland 501
          Poland 500
          Iceland 500
          United States, all students 500
          Sweden 497
          Germany 497
          Ireland 496
          France 496
          Denmark 495
          United Kingdom 494
          Hungary 494
          OECD average 493
          Portugal 489
          Italy 486
          Slovenia 483
          Greece 483
          Spain 481
          Czech Republic 478
          Slovak Republic 477
          Israel 474
          Luxembourg 472
          Austria 470
          [United States, Hispanic students 466]
          Turkey 464
          Chile 449
          [United States, black students 441]
          Mexico 425

        • KHSDD

          I teach kindergarten in an urban setting. In my 10 years doing so, attendance at parent-teacher conferences has consistently been under 50 percent. Many students come to school hungry and with no book bag, yet wear $40 baseball caps and $75 sneakers. Homework completion is rare at best. Many of my calls and notes to parents are ignored. K students arrive in September who can’t identify letters or even their own name in print, which begs the question: what the heck did these parents do with their child during the first 5 years of the kid’s life?

          Sorry, this isn’t about race. It’s about responsibility and accountability.

          If a parent or administrator chooses to observe me during teaching, it is their right and duty. I have no problem bring held accountable. That said, ALL stakeholders in my students’ education should be held accountable instead of being permitted to lay blame strictly on teachers. The problem is politicians like Malloy and education officials like Pryor haven’t the guts to hold parents — aka the voting public — responsible. Instead they enable the lazy, apathetic and irresponsible by hand picking “studies” to bolster their agendas and blatantly ignore the many studies citing the vital role parents have as stakeholders in education.

          The best thing that could happen to urban ed? Bill Cosby as Secretary of Education. Cosby tells it like it is, doesn’t play the race card and made something of himself — not excuses.

        • Andrea Wilson

          WOW! Fist of all– you are using stats to state something I feel is — and remember I am saying “I feel” — racist. Second– how bout a linked source. Third- is it possible the children you are addressing have lower test scores due to teachers who help fail them? I mean if Capital Prep is getting children into 4 year colleges with their plan then why so critical?

        • MsIvy

          In case you haven’t realized it, this is a blog dedicated to the takedown of Steve Perry. The people who post here seldom seem concerned by the failing students throughout the district nor do they offer any proposed solutions. So what the the school is performing, that students are benefiting from scholarships, or that students are going off to college. Nevermind ANY of that. Instead, lets focus on bacon bowls, tweets and his celebrity. Sense my sarcasm here? I understand that some parents may have legitimate complaints about dealings with the school, but what is puzzling to me is the focus on one man when the problem is system wide and systemic. Many of these schools have been failing way before Steve Perry was in his position. Yet, they offer no good explanation for that nor do they offer any solutions. So take down Steve Perry, Stephan Pryer and Malloy then what? Business as usual with more failing schools. I wish Mr. Pelto and his followers would start talking about some REAL solutions. How do we move these students forward????

        • jrp1900

          MsIvy; I completely agree with you that Dr. Steve Perry is a distraction from the real issue of troubled urban school districts. In fact, he is a dangerous distraction. Let me explain. When someone like Steve Perry gets up in public and says, “I have the solution to our educational problems, and, guess what, it’s not going to cost you any real money or any real pain in politically altering segregated schooling. All you have to do is privatize some schools, let me own some of them, and pay me handsomely, and I will guarantee you better results,” I think it only makes sense to be a little skeptical and to ask yourself: what the hell is this man up to?
          I personally would not use the terms “failing students” and “failing schools,” as these suggest that the testing madness makes sense. But you are right that something needs to be done about urban public schooling. This is where Steve Perry is a dangerous distraction. We have a good sense of what needs to be done, but it won’t be cheap and it won’t be politically easy. But right is right, so we should fight for desegregation, more equitable funding, school regionalization, humane school practices, exciting curricula. In a broader sense, we should advocate an end to child poverty, better support for families, more consideration of children in American society. Steve Perry’s “no excuses” nonsense and his bullying ways with children are exactly what we don’t need. Perry is dangerous because he and his kind absorb a lot of social energy that could be better spent on those policies that really will help children.
          The corporate reformers like Perry not because he is effective but because he serves their political interests. He gives voice to the lie that American public schools are in a sorry state because of “bad teachers” and “low expectations.” The reformers don’t want to hear anything about poverty, injustice and racism. Perry obliges. The lie becomes “truth.” The children continue to suffer. That’s why Perry has to be outed for the fraud he is…

        • MsIvy

          So thank you for offering some concrete solutions! And I halfway agree that poverty (systemic poverty) is part of the problem, but does that mean students should have to wait until poverty is somehow evaporated? If there are models that are working beyond the status quo, and privitzing them will provide students with access to more resources, I fail to see the problem. Students, regardless of ethnicity, poverty, etc can learn and succeed given the right amount of resources. We cannot wait for the system to eradicate poverty while more students underperform. Like testing or not, it is some indicator of how students are able to perform (not the only assessment). Would you fly in a plane with a pilot who wasn’t tested on his skills? You want to see him fly the plane, sure, but you want to know that he understands the basics of aviation. Maybe a bad analogy but you get the point. I don’t find privatization to be a threat. I find lack of public funding, politics, low expectations and lack of true accountability to be a threat.

        • jrp1900

          MsIvy: You and I want the same thing: we would like to see justice and equality in American public schooling, but we disagree on how best to bring these about.
          It’s well-known that “systemic poverty” is a crucial factor in educational under-performance. And this is where racism comes in. Racial segregation concentrates poverty and so it concentrates the forces that play into a “failing school district.” It’s obvious that if poor people were spread out in their housing, or if school districts were amalgamated, it would be much more difficult to talk of “failing schools.” In fact, most schools, in a system where class and race segregation did NOT take place, would most likely be judged as successful. It’s another sign of a racist society that we use “race” as a measure of differential schooling, and then when poor minorities “fail,” as might be expected when their schools are starved of resources, we pretend bemusement and ask ourselves: “What can be done about THOSE people?”
          You say that poor children should not have to wait for the abolition of poverty to receive decent schooling. I agree with you 100%. But it isn’t at all clear that “the models” of school reform pushed by corporate reformers are examples of that decent schooling we both desire. It is not true that privatization provides students with more resources. It all depends on which “students” you are talking about. Certainly Special education students have been ill served by the privatization movement, as charter schools have been very reluctant to take them on. The same is true of ELL students. Of course there is a place for examinations in the schooling of children. But standardized tests are not really about the children. They are about profits for the companies that own such tests and who see in public schools a lucrative market for their wares. Schools should be about learning,, not testing. And children will want to learn when they are asked to consider exciting materials. Through children get excited about “memorizing stuff” for the test…
          I definitely would not want to ride on a plane with a pilot who has not been tested. But this is not a good analogy to educating children. The pilot is a professional who agrees to undertake a heavy responsibility. A young child in school is simply a person on their way to becoming who they are or who they might be. Children develop at different speeds and in different ways. And while we might want all of them to be familiar with what “they need to know,” it’s a simple fact that no education system anywhere, at anytime, has ever succeeded in “leaving no child behind.” Perhaps this whole way of looking at the matter is exactly what is wrong. Maybe the children should lead, and the adults should follow. In other words, maybe the schools should be more respectful of children AS children…

        • ReTired

          To the previous posters asking for a solution: Do you honestly believe Sir Steve, if still reigning would actually entertain a solution that doesn’t match his agenda and modus operandi? This is why the castle must be cleansed now before the people’s reform moves forward-if it ever does.

        • jonpelto

          Mslvy,

          This blog has covered a wide variety of topics. As a result it went from a few hundreds hits a day to over 27,000 in the last 72 hours.

          I’ve repeatedly made it clear = poverty, language barriers and special education needs are the three greatest factors in contributing to the achievement gap.

          We need to have an instructional assistant in every classroom to help support teachers and students, we need to dramatically expand bi-lingual education and English Language programs and we step up to ensure students with special education needs get the services we need and deserve. We need to get off the standardized teaching frenzy and return to having classrooms dedicated to instruction and not test prep.

          I write about Steve Perry because the truth about his activities need to come out

          But I urge you go to through my 1,340 posts and you’ll see that I have worked hard to shine the light of truth on a variety of issues, problems and individuals.

        • Ed Harris

          Andrea, above you cite a NPR story that the average for Americans in on par with the Slovaks. I pointed out that when you break things down by race in this case, but economic class can also be looked at, we see that there is a disparity between races (or classes).

          Why?

          What is happening in the classrooms where the Asian Americans and whites go?

          Why isn’t this happening with the hispanic and african american children (on average.)

          Or, go find the top flying African Americans or Hispanics in this country and compare what they receive to what the low performers get.

          As for my source, I used the same website you did (http://www.oecd.org/pisa/). I took the time to get their data and break it down.

          As for Steve Perry, based upon what he tweets, writes and speaks, I would not want my tax dollars going to him under the guise that he is providing an public education.

    • David Lynch Topitzer

      Virtually all of the countries on this list do not have diverse student populations as the US does. Moreover, these countries have students take tests in around 9th grade that determine whether the students are headed to college or not. Those who are not going to college learn trades and are not factored into this PISA data. In the US we have this assumption that all students are college bound, thus this discrepancy really reflects how well the US is educating all of its students, not just those on a college track.

      • Andrea Wilson

        Perhaps you need to re-read the reports– I know there are some countries where there is the division however, the children still go to school– I can provide you with the World CIA Factbook if you like? It addresses how long children receive an education as well as the dropout rates.

      • Andrea Wilson

        David– what does diversity have to do with learning? Sorry but this sounds very much like you are suggesting a more homogeneous population is expected to do better?

        • R.L.

          Poverty=Lower Test Scores. It’s that simple.

        • Andrea Wilson

          Seriously?! I raised 3 children in poverty– my youngest was killed but in 7th grade was reading almost at 12th– my middle child having not studied for the SAT went to take it — did not eat breakfast– was running late with me yelling at him and he scored off the charts. My oldest was a bit wild– but far from stupid! Owns business with spouse — so tell me again how poverty equals lower test scores? Personally I believe this is code for something else.

        • R.L.

          I guess you’re just better than the average bear. You seem to like data and doing internet research. How does poverty equal lower test scores? Look it up. There’s lots of information on it.

        • Andrea Wilson

          Yep and you know why– cause I did not allow teachers (some were good but most were pompous, self-righteous, idiots) who insisted on telling far too many they weren’t good enough. Those teachers who were not the good ones (there were good ones and I need to stress this) judged, condemned, complained, and insulted not only my children but any and all they did the same to. The teachers were not good enough! They had to teach in a city and deal with real issues and were miserable human beings– the were self-loathing and they passed their disease to the children who had parents afraid to stand up to them. — some of the young people ended up in trouble and some got by– few made it out of the situation and as my anger with you and your apathy grows — it does so remembering all those young people those teachers failed! You insist on blaming parents, ethnic groups and everyone accept the person you see in the mirror and you sicken me because of it.

        • R.L.

          You be babblin’ yo. Time to take your meds.

        • MsIvy

          Why the constant insults? Surely you are capable and educated enough to have a grown up dialogue without unnecessary insults. Or could YOU be the real Steve Perry. You sound like him. Anyone who disagrees must be crazy right. Hypocrisy at its best! Lol

        • R.L.

          You obviously responded to the wrong person.
          “most were pompous, self-righteous, idiots”
          “The teachers were not good enough!”
          ” the were self-loathing and they passed their disease to the children who had parents afraid to stand up to them.”
          “You insist on blaming parents, ethnic groups and everyone accept the person you see in the mirror and you sicken me because of it.”
          “teachers don’t want to be accountable”
          “some of you feel they are less”
          “I’m stating the unions cherry pick who.they protect and those protected are not always worthy of protection due to being bullies themselves.”
          (about Dianne Ravitch) “I don’t know if she is a racist but she clearly is a deniest.”

          But then again, you both have the same agenda, you are selective in what you consider “real proof on issues” and try to bait people into writing things that you “feel is — and remember I am saying “I feel” — racist.”
          You don’t know me, but I know you. You are minions of Steve Strap Up Perry. You are the enemy.
          Enjoy the snow.

        • MsIvy

          Classy and mature response. I hope and pray you are not in a classroom. I work when it snows. I won’t be enjoying time off. Will u? Hmmm.

        • KHSDD

          Oh please. Get over yourself.

        • MsIvy

          I’m too high to get over myself. High on my horse laughing at you all spout so much hate and anger at each other while children suffer. No wonder there is so much bullying in the world. All children have to do is look at adults for great examples of how to tear each other down with name calling, weak attacks and immature responses. Bravo adults!

        • KHSDD

          Grow up.

        • MsIvy

          That was my suggestion to you. So yes. You got my message. You need to grow up and stop spitting so much hate. Its not productive and serves no one…especially not the little ones in your classroom. Continue to be that loving person you claim to be and let it shine through your actions and words.

        • KHSDD

          You’re looking for an argument. I posted how I contribute to the success and welfare of kids. What have you done? My suggestion to you is yo stop condescending to teachers as if you are in the know. Want to make a difference? Volunteer at a school that is understaffed, lacking even the most basic supplies, and is loaded with underprivileged kids, some of whom have had traumatic experiences as young as 3. Instead you post nonsense here to make yourself feel as though you’re making a contribution to society. You make me sick.

        • MsIvy

          I am looking for an argument. WAIT WHAT??? Aw sweetie you seem upset and if I make you sick I pray you heal. My intension was not to upset you so I apologize if your feelings are hurt. You don’t know me and while I appreciate your suggestions for how I can help, I have done many of the things you suggest and I continue. You may have passed me in the halls of your school. Wink. But you came after me with hateful remarks and insults when my comments were not initially directed at you nor did I say anything about bashing good teachers. Stop projecting your own insecurities on me. That doesn’t work. I’ll state it again, if you are the caring teacher you say you are, keep going. You don’t need to justify your credentials to me nor do I have justify mine to you. All of this fighting and hate is counterproductive (as I continue to state). I am interested in solutions because what’s happening today ISNOTWORKING. Be it parents, teachers, the government, etc fighting each other while the kids suffer is silly. I support privatization which I guess, on this blog, makes me the evil devil spawn. I’ll take that but know this, I live in this city, but if my child is going to be subjected to this bickering and nastiness, I’ll take my high paid tax dollars out of this city to one of those private schools you all fear so much…

        • R.L.

          If you support privatization then you are evil spawn.

        • KHSDD

          Isn’t laughing at others while thinking highly of oneself in fact bullying? Glad you’re not my kid’s teacher.

        • MsIvy

          I do think highly of myself and I do laugh at immature behavior of adults. Not sure if that’s bullying. Did I harm you? If so, I guess I am a bully. But high self esteem, high expectations are just that. I am not a teacher but if I was (taught at the college level before), I would want my kids to feel great about themselves while treating others with respect

        • Andrea Wilson

          Wonder if you realize how discriminatory that statement is? Then again seldom do people who hate ever see themselves. You know, my middle child had friends he played basketball with and came to my house and I really am angry they did not mean more to their teachers. Some are in jail- some are stuck and I really wish I knew of one of those young men who came into my home, were respectful and kind that made it and is happy. BTW my middle child is a CFA– I believed in him even when he rebelled against me and his own intelligence. You know, he had teachers who thought he wouldn’t go anywhere and actually communicated that to me? Go ahead and insult me and put down the mentally ill– that’ll make you feel less miserable about yourself. Good luck with that.

        • brutus2011

          to “Andrea Wilson”

          Please stop with this vitriol.

        • Andrea Wilson

          Wondering just what makes it vitriol– where is the bitterness and/or cruelty? I asked questions– the answers were not really logical debate.

        • R.L.

          Really???
          “most were pompous, self-righteous, idiots”
          “The teachers were not good enough!”
          ” the were self-loathing and they passed their disease to the children who had parents afraid to stand up to them.”
          “You insist on blaming parents, ethnic groups and everyone accept the person you see in the mirror and you sicken me because of it.”
          “teachers don’t want to be accountable”
          “some of you feel they are less”
          “I’m stating the unions cherry pick who.they protect and those protected are not always worthy of protection due to being bullies themselves.”
          (about Dianne Ravitch) “I don’t know if she is a racist but she clearly is a deniest.”
          If anyone should be looking in the mirror, it’s you. You are so far off the handle it’s hard to take you seriously. This is not about taking one person down. It’s about putting an end to a so called reform movement that is harmful and geared towards making money for a few at the expense of many. Most of the many are the kids who need the most help, you know the special education kids, the ELL kids, and the psychologically troubled kids who are weeded out of old Strap Up Steve’s PUBLIC school and the many schools around the state and the country that are similar “his”. These schools, which practice similar forms discrimination so they can artificially inflate their holy test scores that you began this “debate” so fixated on. Get a grip already.

        • Andrea Wilson

          OK- of course you chose to take bits and pieces of my statements– Allow me to break it down for you:
          The teachers were idiots because they were pompous and self-righteous– that remains my opinion of anyone who would put a child in their care into a peg where they don’t consider them good enough (this was clearly stated to me by one high school teacher/coach) there were others but none making it this clear to me or other parents. It’s high school– and they are children and ought to be allowed that.
          Addressing the self hate– well here it is and Odetta put it best about not putting others down and yet I witnessed this by teachers who had their ideas about the students they taught– in turn the impact on the children were their belief that all they were was the label those idiots put on them (that’s why I called them idiots– ok you got me there). But the self-hate was shared with the children who did not feel good enough about themselves to fight back and tell them they are worth it (which all children are!).
          It does sicken me when people refuse to accept their share of responsibility and if a student fails then so does the teacher (whatever role that teacher has or who they are). And when teachers fail to look in the mirror and see where they could have done better (and who can’t?) it does sicken me. And worse yet is when they place all of the blame on the children who have been entrusted to their care by our society. Most teachers and people for that matter don’t accept responsibility for their failings– this is really true.
          And if people did not feel others were less we would be talking about how we could do better rather than justifying the mess ups of others. Isn’t that the point of most of the posts– to point out Perry’s faults and say how your way is better? Wonder if you ever tried working together or addressing what appears to be somewhat successful for the children who make it to those 4 year schools? Sorry- to me that is the best of what is being done at the school run by the man you all hate– if it were me I would do everything I could to keep the school there and to work with the man. He may not be a saint and far from it but something good is happening and that must not be discounted.
          As a past union vp– I have personal first hand knowledge of the cherry picking I addressed– I never complained when members called me in the middle of the night– and I was extremely successful in saving more than one job– I gave the very best of what I had to give and while I am certain failed some (who does not fail someone) I can say I did my best. I am not seeing that here– I am seeing blame and the buck being passed. so if that is objectionable then don’t engage me cause I will respond.
          And I also know about being bullied by union officials– the only way I was elected was pushing back and winning. Of course the minute that happened it was all out war with our E-Board who protected a president who used the union money as her personal bank account!
          Ravitch is a denier– read her blog — I did. She first supported charter schools then changed her mind and she denies the good which these schools have done. So yes, I called her a deniest.
          It is you who I believe needs to get a grip– show me and everyone else how you are making it better for the children you teach. Sorry but my own experience with charter schools is limited to personal experience and in my case — they were far better than the public school. Had my grandson stayed in public school I’m certain he would never be in high school which he loves!
          Here’s a challenge– prove you can do better and do it!

        • R.L.

          Yada, yada, yada. Like I said, you so off that you can’t be taken seriously. I know what I do, and I see what you’re doing here. I certainly don’t need to prove sh-t to the likes of you.

        • Andrea Wilson

          See- you just proved my point– I guess I sorta feel sorry for you.

        • R.L.

          You have no credibility. You are an agitator and a public school teacher basher. You also have some sorry-ass logic.

        • Andrea Wilson

          Agitator– yes and I admit it. The others things– I guess it’s relative.

        • KHSDD

          Bull. I’ve worked in urban ed for 10 years, my father for over 30, and neither he note I ever uttered or heard a teacher say a kid couldn’t achieve. I have heard them address insubordinate, disrespectful kids that they won’t achieve unless they change their ways. I have heard them tell kids that despite their home situation — some situations are truly unsettling — that school is a place that offers refuge wand opportunity.

          I resent the racist tone of your remarks. I treat my students — regardless of skin color — like I treat my daughter. I spend money on them, lose sleep over them, nurture them, challenge them, wipe their tears, clean their noses, and teach them that their actions come with consequences. My kids know I love them.

        • Andrea Wilson

          Worked in ed for 30 years and the best you can start out is “Bull?” OK now that’s off my chest– so you never heard anyone? I can only take you at your word but…???
          Just wondering how you or they addressed these “insubordinate, disrespectful kids” when either they or you have felt they were so? While you’re at it what type of “ways” did you feel they needed to change?
          And while some homes may be as you described, are you totally denying the possibility the school, teachers, or administrators could be at fault or that school can in fact be a place children need refuge from? Just wondering.
          As far as the “racist time” you are feel in my remarks– I don’t believe I stated any child was superior or did better on tests and used skewed test scores to back that up– I do however recall other posters who did so and clearly stated there was a vast difference between them– BTW where on those tests is there a place to fill out ethnic group or the word “race?” I don’t ever remember seeing it– so how do they get the results of who is what? When I see the word “race” I normally tend to fill out other and human– but that’s me.
          As far as loving your “kids” go they are young people, human beings, and children– not billy goats! While I believe it is possible to love many and maybe even love others as much as the ones we have spent their entire lives with– but I honestly think it’s good of you to attempt to feel that way.
          There are many people I have spent money on, lost sleep over, nurtured, mourned for, been happy for and so on– but I would be lying to you if I said I loved anyone as I have my children– that’s just not possible for me because my children are the people I would give my life for, have given up other things for, and would happily do so again– no matter the outcome– that is not true for every human being I meet and I accept that.
          I hope you have stated facts and not what you need to believe– and if so– if you love the children you speak of so much– then is it not part of love to set boundaries and limitations? How do you choose to set them– what do you do when it’s time for them to deal with the consequences of their actions?
          The objective here is not to even bother to respond to me– just for each of us reading (including myself) to think about the question.
          Attack me if it makes you feel better. I sincerely hope it does– cause at least that would be positive. I have seen actions of attack here against policies of isolating children for negative behavior– in behavior modification, negative is met with no attention and positive is met with positive attention– now I might be wrong, but isolating someone who is not following the rules is well Behavior Modification–unless I am missing something here– I might — but all my questions and statements have been responded to with attacks, suggestions the children are disadvantaged due to ethnic group, and stating this Perry guy is a monster. Attacks do no good– suggesting children or anyone is what they were born into to is racist regardless of if you wish to accept it or not and a witch hunt is just that– the man is a CNN contributor or has been so I start to think– what is behind this? I have not really seen proof, just allegations. So, forgive me for thinking just because it’s on a post on the Internet, it has to be true.

        • KHSDD

          Yes, bull. Or shall I say bullsh-t considering you are so good at shoveling it? Just calling it like I see it.

          Let me educate you: there is no one prescribed way of dealing with insubordinate and disrespectful students, for each student is unique and responds in his or her own way to advice and redirection. But you knew that already.

          All I read from you are excuses and accusations. Which are what I get from many parents of my little ones; it’s never their fault. You ought to spare us all here, who know better, from your sermons and preach the importance of education and accountability to those who display zero interest in their own child’s education.

          Stop with the lame counter attacks and tired race card bit for they merely prove you haven’t anything of substance to contribute.

        • Andrea Wilson

          Humm, sounds like you may have it wrong– but you can have that.
          Well I no longer have little ones– I have grown up children who in spite of what others thought or attempted to tell me have done pretty well for themselves– good jobs, happy, and still growing as human beings–but human beings who communicate very well.
          I have no excuses for my children– I don’t need any, however I remain concerned about the future of other children and my grandchildren (no so much now because they are in a school system which seems to work well for them).
          Wondering who appointed you the judge in who does or does not have anything to contribute– again you can have that one. While you make statements about myself and others– wonder what you see when you look in the mirror.
          I am not perfect and certainly was not perfect as a parent– yet success has not eluded my family and for that I am grateful.
          I know about struggle, judgment, and teachers who are both good and bad. I also know of way too many promising young people who were lost and forgotten—— that is not at all acceptable to me.
          I also know there are things I can and can’t do– I realize it is not at all possible to have a reasonable debate here or even to have anything at all which resembles one.
          Finally, if this is all you have to offer and if you continue to deny the racism which is clearly apparent in a lot of these posts, then it is not a good use of my time and I should go back to ignoring this blog. Too bad because isn’t education supposed to be about the exchange of ideas, inclusion, questioning, discussion and through it knowledge? Oh sorry– I am getting education confused with the Socratic Method.
          Perhaps the next time you assert someone has made excuses for themselves you really ought to either know the facts or at least asked? Besides the substance here appears to be shallow– as it always is when the intention is merely to take down one person or one group with only anger and frustration.

    • R.L.

      https://ed.stanford.edu/news/poor-ranking-international-tests-misleading-about-us-performance-new-report-finds
      Stop trying to help promote the corporate takeover of public schools. The tests are not using controlled groups of students. Also, the US may not rank as high as you would like to see, but Connecticut is (or was before the likes of Pryor, Vallas, and Adamowski) one of the top performing states in the country. How does Connecticut rank? Go reform Mississippi. The problem here is the inequity between the have schools and the have-not schools. Malloy has been doing his darndest to prevent this issue from going to court. Fortunately, the case will be heard (this summer?). It will be nice publicity for the one and done govorner’s campaign.

    • MBC

      In 2005 we were ranked in the top twenty. Far from perfect, however, better than the grim projections that you present. What is evident is that the billions being blown on ed reform has done nothing.

      I’ll give you a forecast to fret about, if people don’t put the brakes to ed reform we will drop out of the top 50, and by the time I can say told you so, it’ll be far too late.

  • Ebony in Hartford

    He isn’t dark-skinned though. That wouldn’t play in Missoula, and Iowa and the Southern HBCUs that invite him to speak. He is biracial, but never ever mentions being raised by his white teen mother in Middletown low income housing. Instead he uses his racial ambiguity and skin color privilege as cudgels to appeal to the worst essentialist notions about race and class and gender to white and black folks alike who like his Booker T Washington ‘bootstraps’ narrative. He’d rather insult the morning drop off wear of poor and working class black mothers, because they’re an easy target, than really deal with the dual legacies of race and poverty.

  • Ed Harris

    “Insane bloggers?”
    The New Jersey transplant with time on her hands?

  • Jim Spellman

    A huge mistake would be to underestimate or denigrate the intellect of Steve Perry. He has been totally successful in moving his agenda and enriching his coffers. He is a virtuoso at playing a game that allows him to create the rules as the game moves on. He has HBE, Pryor, Malloy in his hip pocket – none of whom dare cross him.
    He has brilliantly borrowed a technique of subduing opposition from post- Stalin Russia – “Those that differ must be mentally ill.” It will take far more than indignant anonymous postings to bring this Bad Boy down – and he knows it. He laughs at his opposition – rightly so – as it will not go to combat him, playing hardball, where he rules the field. Toughen up or back off – Perry is eating your lunch.

    • speaking up

      I take issue with your use of the word “intellect” in this comment. I would characterize Dr. Steve Perry as being opportunistic and I might even give him a “shrewd,” but his intellect is absolutely not his strongest suit. Right time, right place… aggressive approach to all of the “right” players in a contentious public game…

      All of this being said, I thank you for making this comment yesterday. I’m not worried about lunch, but I don’t like to be told to back off.

      I don’t know that what I needed to do was to “toughen up” so much as “prioritize differently.” It takes time, energy and persistence to show up and speak up. As a single, full-time working mom, I don’t have any “extra” time or energy but I do have persistence to spare. I thought about going to the BOE meeting and likely would not have if I hadn’t read this comment.

      My child is no longer at Capital Prep. It would be much easier to back off; I no longer have a dog in this Perry-specific fight. My child will be growing up in this world, though, and I don’t want to hand my child’s generation a world that I didn’t work to make better. What I see happening with ed reform is frightening; our kids deserve better. I’m willing to do what I can to change things. The personal experience and knowledge that I have is with Dr. Steve Perry at Capital Prep. I guess that this means that I dare cross him. I know that it means that I will not be backing off.

  • MsIvy

    So now dark skinned (assuming you mean black) people are ripping off people and getting away with it. Please give me the address to the rock you live under so I can send you endless articles about the corruption of dark skinned counterparts and the numbers of dark skinned people in jail. You sound very racist sir (not accusing you of being a racist, just saying you sound like one). OJ. What does he have in common other than being black and a celebrity…nada. Oh I get it. OJ got off the first time and you’re still mad. Lets stick to the issues of education and direct our anger toward how the system is failing kids.