Fewer Teachers, More Administrators: Education Reform the Adamowski Way

While Bridgeport is getting the headlines (and the loans), in Windham, at the other end of the state, “Special Master” Steven “where is my pension” Adamowski continues to implement a turnaround strategy that relies on fewer teachers and more administrators.

Not satisfied with simply having a $225,000 “Special Master” and a $140,000 Superintendent of Schools (as well as an Assistant Superintendent of Schools), the Windham Board of Education will announce tonight that a Manchester Elementary School principal will become Windham’s new Deputy Superintendent of Schools.

Because, as we’ve noted before, you just can’t have too many superintendents!

In addition to the regular cadre of administrators, principals, vice principals and the like, Adamowski has also created two new administrative titles, two new people who will be called “Headmasters” and two new people who will be called “Dean of Students.”

Oh, and don’t forget the “Special Master’s” decision to create the position of  “Special Administrative Manager (SAM)” whose job it will be to oversee Windham’s  high school (which Adamowski has renamed an Academy.)

Meanwhile, when it comes to actually educating children;

70 percent of Windham students are minority, but only one in ten who work for Windham’s schools are minority.

Nearly three-quarters of Windham’s students come from households that are so poor that they receive free or reduced school lunches.

60 percent of Windham’s students are Latino and more than a third of the students aren’t fluent in English.

And 16 percent of the students receive special education services, nearly 50 percent more than most towns.

So what did Adamowski do when he arrived?

Of the first dozen teachers he laid off, three (3) were bi-lingual or English as a Second Language teachers and three (3) were special education teachers.

Instead Adamowski signed a contract with Teach For America, and although they bring tremendous energy and commitment to a school, TFA could not guarantee how many, if any, of the temporary teachers would be bi-lingual and none would be certified to provide special education services.

The notion that it is better to look good then feel good may be an acceptable strategy in Hollywood, but calling your high school an academy, your principals headmasters and having a couple of “Dean of Students” walking around doesn’t take the place of a functioning education program.

  • We do not need more administration we need more teachers and teacher input to the problems with our school system. All Malloy is doing with this scheme is paying off his campaign funders and throwing our children under the buss.

  • Linda174

    Those who can teach, those who can’t administrate. Too many schools are top heavy and they are all tripping over each other to tell us what to do and in most cases they contradict each other, therefore we ignore them all.

  • R.L.

    Same thing he did in Hartford.  Schools that used to have one principal now having four, having a team of public relations writers which I believe had ties to the Courant, breaking schools into acadamies to give the illusion of school choice while skimming the best students into magnet schools.  More and more time is spent producing data that doesn’t actually address the real issues.  The data always seems to show we need more data.  So teachers need to spend more time producing data.  Rather than learning about and sharing ideas about projects that worked in the classroom, a method  used to help bring a struggling student back into the game, or even some old fashioned bonding activities that help produce a more efficient team, teachers spend their professional development learning how to use the latest data collection software the  administration spent $1,000,000,000 on.  Sounds like Vallas is using the same strategy with his claim that more, less weighted, tests are really what’s needed to get reliable data.  When they finish collecting this data they seem to find that they then need a new specialist to analyze this new mountain of data, which justifies the need for another six figure administrator.  The new administrator’s results show…………More data is needed.

    You showed us how he manipulated the data to get test scores up.  What many people don’t know is that teachers were required to give a minimum grade of 55 for an F.  A student could have gotten a 75 for one quarter, not show up to school again, and recieve credit for the class.  That’s how the graduation rate went up.

    Is it like this in the suburbs?

    • guest

      Thank you, this is just what many of us suspected regarding the Hartford “turnaround.”
      It’s coming soon to an urban district near you, although not (yet) to the suburbs…. 

      • Allenmarko

        Don’t be so sure its not in the suburbs.  We had a similar edict a few years back in my district – don’t give anything below a 60 (which is failing in our district)

        • Mark II

          My school too. It is very hard to combat grade inflation with such nonsense going on.

          Oh, and why does Windham need TFA? There is no teacher shortage in our area, other than highly specialized subjects, and any layoffs would seem to confirm that. It seems like a blatant cost-cutting measure. Maybe this is why Windham is dragging its heels so badly with hiring and interviewing.

        • guest

          Ask the Board of Ed.  The current chair, “Dr.” Murph Sewall, loves TFA.  Can it be that he is bursting with pride over a fellow princetonian, Wendy Kopp, founder of TFA?  Anyway, they like to say it’s another “tool” in our kit and that “we’ve” tried everything–everything but fully fund the budget, pay teachers comprably to other districts, treat teachers, students, and parents with respect and a few other thngs…

        • guest

          thanks, I did suspect this, the general “dumbing down” of standards.
          School should be entertainment, especially if electronically delivered, and core standards should be flattened, so no one need think critically. 

      • Linda174

        Same here – give a 50 no matter what they earn for each mp (so when you don’t show up for your job as an adult, you will still get 50% of your pay?) and at the end of the year 63 and 64 has to become a 65.

    • Bill Morrison

      As long as we are talking about The Grand Fraud Adamowski, let’s open the discussion to include his falsification of data in open violation of our Code of Conduct. He forced schools to artificially inflate graduation rates by imposing a lowest failing grade of 55, which means that any given student could pass a half-credit course by attending class during marking period one and earning a grade of 65, then never attend another class for marking period two, and pass the course with a 60 average. Similarly, a student could earn a 75 for MP1 and never attend class for the rest of the year; he/she would pass with a 60. If that wasn’t enough, he threatened teachers and administrators into passing students along, even if they had not passed a single course.  As a result, we now have many students in Hartford entering high school who cannot read, write, or compute simple arithmetic problems to the third grade level. Adamowski conveniently ignored attendance requirements as long as his artificially high minimum failing grade kept students from failing.

      This is not mere rhetoric; this happened with intense regularity during Adamowski’s reign in Hartford. I even have evidence that teacher’s grade books were tampered with to change failing grades into passing grades.

      As for data, I am very surprised that no one has considered that Adamowski’s method of measuring school success, the OSI, is statistically unreliable, hence, invalid. Statistical reliability means that the instrument truly measures that which it purports to measure. Reliability also means that the variables are limited or removed entirely. Since the OSI only measures each cohort of students only once, it cannot measure school or student growth. Since Adamowski used the OSI to measure school growth across cohorts, meaning that next year’s students CAPT scores will be used in the OSI to measure how far this year’s students have grown, it is a preposterous instrument at best.  Therefore, the OSI is invalid as an instrument to measure school or student improvement.

      Adamowski used data from the OSI to ruin people’s lives, to fire teachers, to break up schools, to limit educational opportunities for students, and to limit real growth among our students.  I have called his legacy one of institutional racism.

      To sum up Adamowski’s methods:

      1. Break up functioning schools into so-called academies that limit educational opportunities for students.

      2. Fire teachers, hire many more administrators.

      3. Replace permament teachers with TFA Temps.

      4. Create a numbers situation in which students only have to attend school for one quarter to pass either a semester or year, less than one quarter when absences during that quarter are factored in.

      5. Falsify CAPT scores, as mentioned elsewhere.

      6. Create a system of measuring school success that is not based on sound research and statistical methodologies (the OSI), neither being reliable or valid.

      7. By the way, has anyone tracked transportation data to see how much Hartford Public Schools is spending sending busses throughout the city to pick up few students in Adamowski’s system of choice?

      Bill Morrison

      • guest

        Many thanks for this.  Where is the State Board of Education, that fawns over Adamowski on a regular basis?  Allan Taylor, who curtails his own questions to accomodate the great reformer?  But this is the same State Board of Ed that is underwriting Vallas’s regime of repression in Bridgeport.

        • Bill Morrison

          My concern is this; where are our political leaders, those who are supposed to prevent such a situation or fix them when they occur?  Many people know these facts; they are failing to act upon them!  As someone said to me this past week, “Where’s the revolution?”

        • Bill Morrison

          Also, where’s our “Woodward and Bernstein”, reporters who would thrive on exposing such corruption? Reporters today seem to be in the thrall of men like Adamowski.

        • jonpelto

          I’ve tried to hand a lot of this stuff over to “real” reporters… I enjoy putting it up on the blog but I know that if a major media outlet used it – I could then write about it – but it would reach a lot more people.

          Some are just too busy, some don’t understand the seriousness of the situation and some are so worried that the Malloy Administration will be mad that they don’t want to get cut out so they won’t write something this critical.

          So, in the meantime, I’ll keep putting it up here and hoping some reporters take notice.

        • Msavage51

          I don’t think you’re going to get a Woodward and Bernstein–type response from today’s reporters for a number of reasons, many of which Jon has already pointed out. Are you aware of what today’s CT reporters are getting paid? I can verify that at one of the major CT dailies it’s just over $12 per hour. There is pressure to produce, produce, produce. Not a lot of encouragement or time to do in-depth, investigative stuff. Plus, at $12/hour, many in the news biz need to take on outside work to get by.

          Re the legislators–they’re obviously going to be useless here–haven’t they proven that by now?

        • Bill Morrison

          Let’s call it like it is. There are no reporters with the courage to do the right thing here. Instead, we get the Rick Green’s of this world, those who simply serve as mouthpieces to what people like Adamowski and Malloy want them to say. We are facing a serious issue here and it need serious reporting!

        • guest

          Thank you for all your posts and R.L.’s–it is refreshing and heroic to finally hear the truth about Adamowski.

        • Bill Morrison

          Jon,

          What can we do to create a newsworthy event?

        • guest

          The Willimantic Chronicle basically publishes only pro-Adamowski articles, and it is clear he even tells them which themes to treat.  It’s just puff piece after puff piece with no content or investigations.

      • guest

        You forgot a few Adamowski chestnuts, like manipulate the budget so that funds come from other steams (city/town budget) or from private investors who ultimately make money off the system.  Of course, when he left Cincinnati in tatters, worse than he found it, with worse budget deficits, he had at least delivered public funds to the charter school operators and educational product investors and he had broken the teacher’s unions and shredded collective bargaining.  So, a success for the 1%.

      • Linda174

        Unbelievable…absolutely unbelievable. Jon, can you get this to AlanTaylor somehow? This is a disgrace and this man has a good reputation while teachers are being demeaned. I am horrified!

        • guest

          Allan Taylor, former Hartford BoE member and on the State BoE for too long… He seems to adore Adamowski, and he is very much implicated in the Bridgeport takeover.

    • R.L.

      I want to correct an obvious mistake.  The software cost $1,000,000, not $1,000,000,000. 

  • guest

    Windham is what, one tenth the size of Hartford?  And yet they need this bloated administration?  Oh, silly me, of course they do!  They don’t need greedy teachers, now Windham is a site for TFA!

    • Msavage51

      Said it before and I’ll say it again (and again)…there needs to be a  mass protest on the steps of the Capitol building. If teachers are the only ones intelligent and informed enough to see what’s going on, they need to take the initiative. If you wait around for parents to “get it” it’ll be too late–masses of teachers will lose their jobs to creeps like Adamowski and Vallas. Damage will be done to an entire generation of children. Our legislators are too timid and uninformed to “save” us. The only way to combat this is a mass showing of opposition, in my opinion. I TOTALLY understand why teachers are reluctant to jeopardize jobs, bring down more public villification upon themselves, etc. But what’s the alternative? The best way to draw attention to the situation, and to make others aware of what’s going on, is to FORCE them to listen. Hard to ignore thousands of folks carrying signs and chanting on the steps of the state Capitol building, right?

      • Bill Morrison

        Where are our unions? They need to be organizing a serious resistance to this. Don’t they work for us? 

        • Msavage51

          Exactly–as it is the teachers who are most obviously and directly under fire  (though all of us here understand there are extremely serious implications for students as well)–why isn’t union leadership organizing a massive protest? You asked about a newsworthy event–how about thousands of teachers and students and parents on the steps of the state Capitol building? Hard to ignore–even for corporate-owned media outlets. The unions organized a protest before the bill vote. Where are they now?

        • Brutus2011

          Our teacher’s union’s management (local, state, and national) are part of the status quo. They have to play ball with the administrators and politicians. They have to in order to keep their salaries and to have a seat at the table to ostensibly help the rank and file teacher.

          Our teacher’s union’s management should be, in my opinion, leading the effort to see to it that public education funds find its way to the classroom instead of being absorbed by admininstrative layers.

          In addition, our teacher’s union’s management should be advocating for greater teacher inclusion in the implementation of the curriculum and instruction.

          Finally, our teacher’s union’s management should begin to start talking about some kind of leveling of salaries between teachers and administrators. The elimination of the great disparity in pay will go a long way to eliminating the shenanigans and corruption those above the classroom engage in to keep their status–all of which damages the education and prepartion of our future generations. (and no, I am not a socialist or a communist–remember this is not the private sector–those in public education are supposed to be working for us and to honor the public trust)

      •  When teachers speak up their is a pink slip in their mail box the next day. Teachers should be brought into and discussion on education not just be used as a political tool for politicians making excuses for poor leadership. The unions need to start earning their pay and back their members instead of collecting dues and throwing them under the buss.

  • Msavage51

    Sorry to sound like a broken record, but here’s another thought re peaceful protest/non-violent opposition. There are a lot of intelligent, thoughtful folks who post here. People who are aware of what is going on around them, who can see that it is unjust, and who want a world where people are treated more fairly. I read a lot of news on a lot of different sites. What I read in the comments sections of some of the “mainstream” sites scares me. Judging by these comments, I’ve come to the conclusion that there are a lot of scary people out there. Racists, homophobes, misogynists. When we reach the tipping point (and we’re getting there–Foxwoods and Nokia layoffs are two of the top stories on the Channel 3 web site this morning)–when we reach the tipping point those folks aren’t likely to be drawn to dealing with their frustrations in a peaceful, non-violent way. I’m afraid that if the peaceful, thoughtful folks don’t take to the streets soon and force change through non-violent opposition, the scarier factions of society will take to the streets their own way. Can we really just stand by and watch that happen?

    • Bill Morrison

      I emphatically agree. But, we need someone to lead the effort. Our unions will not do so. Indeed, when I presented this information to the Hartford Federation of Teachers, I was simply told that the union had agreed to these measures, including the OSI. Assuming that our HFT leadership did not really understand the issue of statistical reliability and validity, I tried to explain the concept, even presenting them with reference materials from my doctoral research methodologies courses; they remained uninterested. Yet, teachers, students, and schools were continuing to be hurt by the Adamowski regime.

      Go figure . . . my Social Studies Department has no textbooks and one computer cart that we share with our Academy.  When Adamowski broke our district into the various academies, not all academies were provided with equal resources.  Yet, the district just spent over $1,000,000 onTeachScape, a computer-based teacher evaluation system!  How many resources would that money have provided for teachers and students?  Somehow, though, this counts as “education reform”!

      I believe that the State Teachers Unions should take the lead because they are uniquely positioned to contact and coordinate our efforts to stop this madness before it becomes too entrenched. In lieu of strikes, which are illegal in this state, I believe that we should coordinate a statewide “Teacher’s Flu” for 3 or 4 days coupled with subsequent demonstrations at the State House or Governor’s residence. We need to do something to drive home our concerns and our resistance.

      • Follow the Money

         But here’s the rub, Bill – this is the first I’ve heard this, and I am sure I am not alone. NO one knows, because the mainstream media chooses what to write about, and that information would never see the light of day because it would challenge the crap they print under the guise of news.

        • Bill Morrison

          You are absolutely correct! That is why we have to organize our collective efforts and sing out LOUDLY! The people of Connecticut are being robbed by these political thugs in the name of education reform.

      • guest

        Again, thanks for this information.  It’s time to start getting the word out.  There is a wall of indifference, not to mention a mountain of propaganda to cover it up.  I wil lkeep “TeachScape” in mind!

      • guest

        You have enlightened many of us who only had vague suspicions (because it seemed strange that hardly any bad news was coming out about Adamowski)… I know it is hard to connect the dots and such.
        I think Diane Ravitch would be very interested in your accounts of Adamowski.  The right-wing foundations will keep giving him awards and accolades and he will probably score a position as “Gap-Closing Grand Wizard” at UConn since they seem to be jumping on this lucrative bandwagon… but maybe some hard facts will finally stop him.  Also, Pryor has got to go–he is a corporate zealot–look how he is fast-tracking the commissioner’s network and replicating the Special Master bullshit legislation.

        • Bill Morrison

          In fact, I had sent Diane Ravitch a copy of a letter I sent to Malloy; she sent a copy of the letter to Jonathan Pelto.

        • guest

          She should be publishing your letter!

        • Bill Morrison

          I sincerely wish that someone would!  I have sent copies to Malloy, to Ms. Ravitch (hence to Jonathan Pelto; and to Presdent Obama. I have received no comments from neither Malloy or Obama. I also sent one to Rick Green, who said that he disagrees with many of my points. I might have to pay to take it out as a full-page ad in some newspaper!

        • guest

          Have you tried doing it as an op-ed for the Courant or Ct newsjunkie?  I think it should be more widely known, but once it is somewhere, it can be shared and tweeted etc.  Another person to send it to is Valerie Strauss of the Washington Post’s blog the Answer Sheet; she often posts letters on these issues.  Good luck!  Another thing is to read it at a State BoE meeting and submit it for the minutes, then it can be linked… Do you know Connecticut has a chapter of Parents Across American; the nat’l group has a blog with chapter news and the CT chapter has a facebook (parentsacrossamerica.org).  PAA supports REAL reform, not corporate takeovers.

      • Call me–I’ll take the lead–860-227-6668–Tom NHFT Local 933 VP

        • Msavage51

          Didja call him, Bill?  I know that if you get a major action going you’ll have at least one suburban parent standing on the steps with you. My hope is that there will be more. Parents, kids, teachers. Perfect timing, right? School is almost out…Just an impression re the demonstration before the vote on the ed bill…it felt to me, as a non-teacher who was very concerned about the legislation, that the demonstration was exclusionary. Felt like it was a union-only protest and “outsiders” were not encouraged to join in. If you get an action going, I would encourage you to reach out to parents, kids, etc.–make sure you foster an “in this together” type of environment.

        • Bill Morrison

          Thank you for your comments!  I will most certainly push for parent involvement! We teachers desperately need parents to get involved!

        • TMS

          TMS, I will be there too.

          Question for someone much smarter than I: can tax payers make a class action suit against the state for violationg laws of ethics and contract-steering? Is that possible? As I’ve said before, my child will be starting college in the fall so I can’t realistically protest as a parent with any credibility, but these are our tax dollars flying out of our pockets and state. Don’t taxpayers have any say in how they can be spent? Aren’t they clearly breaking laws?

        • TMS

          I apologize for my typos…typing too fast.

        • Bill Morrison

          Why not have a group of us talk to an attorney to find out? That could also help get this ball rolling.

        • Bill Morrison

          Tom,

          I will call later today. I will gladly help take the lead.

        • guest

          I would like to be there, too.  On an earlier thread Thomas B. was called out by a teacher who once worked in the district TB represents, if I remember correctly.  I do not mean to cast aspersions, but if TB is promoting the New Haven model, there are a lot of issues with it.  Still, organizing an action is a start, and the true grassroots voices may emerge.

        • Msavage51

          Know nothing about Tom B.–but I’d have to agree that anyone wishing to take the helm and get things moving is a good thing. Get the people together is the important thing, I think. Get the movement started and it will grow.

        • Great to have you on board—there are NO issues with our model–I can assure you——-it is a benefit to all the players in our school community–We lead by our actions—-and we have a plan that will work–
          Of course — it must be done with integrity — for it to work–the plan is super, now the people involved must make it work—and we will be steering the process TOGETHER—

        • Thanks–Ill call you tomorrow

  • The reporters are out gathering information but it’s the corporate media owners that take the payoffs and only show what these traitor politicians pay them to show. Hopefully this republican governor masquerading as a democrat will be a one term governor.

    • Msavage51

      The reporters are out gathering information but it’s the corporate media owners that take the payoffs and only show what these traitor politicians pay them to show.

      I suspect that’s true for some of the larger, corporate-owned media outlets, yes. The ones that actually have the corporate backing providing money to pay their staff a liveable wage are also the ones who are motivated to stick to the corporate agenda. The privately-owned papers are just struggling to stay alive and cannot afford to pay decent wages. Quite the Catch 22 isn’t it?  The ones with the money have an incentive to protect their corporate backers. The ones with more freedom to report the truth cannot afford to do much more than hang on by their fingernails.

    • jschmidt2

       He’s definitely not a Republican considering how the unions own him and the rest of the Dem controlled legislature.

      •  Malloy is definitely a republican wearing a democrats suit. He supports trickle down, dictatorship and every other corporate republican scheme going.

        • jschmidt2

           No he is a Democrat in the worst sense and he and the Dem controlled legislature continue to drive the state off the cliff by business killing schemes.

        • Bill Morrison

          Do you honestly believe that the unions own Malloy after the pain he is inflicting against them?  You sound like you are a Malloy/Adamowski supporter! Read a book!

        • jschmidt2

          Did any union employees lose their jobs? Did the size of state govt get smaller? How much pay, benefits did the unions give up? Do we still count overtime in pensions? Yes. Malloy was easy on the unions. THey basically got a no layoff guarantee with little givebacks that make a dent. ANd they know he was easy on them. Besides do you think they would vote for Foley? The unions have the Democrats in their pockets.

        • R.L.

          jschmidt2, Get your head out of the Courant. 

          Yes, union employees lost their jobs (before the legislation and under Adamowski).  State government probably stayed about the same, but there were probably more administrators (big salary), less veteran teachers (medium salary), and more TFA recruits (small salary).  Teachers don’t get overtime.  No, malloy was not easy on the unions, the unions have been easy on Malloy, and prior, and Vallas, and Adamowski, and Rhee, and ….

          If the unions had any balls, they’d start supporting Green Party candidates.  When the votes come around that determine whether or not teachers are required to pay union dues, I will certainly be voting no.  They are not representing their members.  The unions should be pushing for media exposure and full out investigations on the shenanigans being pulled all across the country by those in the school “reform” movement.

        • jschmidt2

          I don;t read the Courant. We need a Wisconsin Revolution here.

        • Bill Morrison

          DSo you read anything at all?

        • guest

          Yes!  jschmidt2 clearly had reformed social studies in school.

      • Follow the Money

         Wait…what? The unions own him? Really? He’s doing the UNION bidding? Let’s see…give backs, cuts in pay, cuts in insurance to union employees, layoffs, ploys to break unions in public education, striking the law to keep a minimum of state troopers, also union members, in our state? I must be very very confused, because these do not sound very supportive to me, nor do they sound pro-union. 

        • jschmidt2

          Did any union employees lose their jobs? No. Not even when they committed fraud.  Did the size of state govt get smaller? No. How much pay, benefits did the unions give up? Not much. Do we still count overtime in pensions? Yes. Malloy was easy on the unions. The givebacks were far less then they should have been if Malloy had been serious.  THey basically got a no layoff guarantee with little givebacks that make a dent. ANd they know he was easy on them. Besides do you think they would vote for Foley? The unions have the Democrats in their pockets. THe taxpayer got a huge tax increase and Malloy spent 900million more in his first budget. And the state is still in the hole. We need Walker.

  • Bill Morrison

    Another reform enacted by Adamowski was to kill the well-written curriculum that was in place in Hartford that was strongly based on state standards, as well as firing the Director of Social Studies. For example, the last published Social Studies curriculum was in the 2006-2007 school year. The district has operated without a Social Studies curriculum since then. He also killed World History and replaced it with a course called International Studies for which there is, again, no curriculum or district course description. In other words, History/Social Studies teachers have been teaching that course based on their own interpretations of what it should be, even within the same school.

    Today, some schools are facing NEASC without curricula of any kind. These schools are scrambling to put curricula in place. Otherwise, they stand to lose accreditation.

    • guest

      Don’t worry, in Windham Social Studies has given way to test prep.  That is probably what really happened in Hartford.  If it’s not on the CMTs or CAPT, forget it…  World History?  Who needs it?  It’s just the story of a succession of dictators taken down by the little guys…

      • Msavage51

        They certainly don’t want young people engaging in THAT kind of thinking, do they?

        • guest

          not when the next dictator comes along!
          to the pitchforks!

        • Bill Morrison

          I call it “Institutionalized Racism” because the Adamowski gang seems to target minority populations. By tearing down their schools, Adamowski, Malloy, etc., is condemning these students to little more than minimum wage potentials in their futures.

    • Follow the Money

       Social studies? We don’t need no stinkin’ social studies! Why would we want our young people to be aware of America’s past? Why would we want them to have any sort of debate or discourse on our history? No, no, that would only make people who might have OPINIONS, and THOUGHTS. That could lead to IDEAS, which, well…we all know where that could wind up.

      Thanks to the emphasis on CMT crap, my social studies time was slashed to barely an hour a week. What do I do with that?

  • SamRose

    These are all titles that have been established in the charter schools. Funny, Bridgeport at one point had 4 Assistant Superintendents and lets, only 1 of them is left since none of them actually did anything for the district..oh wait, they did something, they helped to put a deficit in the budget with their salaries alone along with the ex super Ramos! How is this still being allowed????

    • guest

      yes, horrible corporate titles…

  • Ok parents of Willimantic–please take out a lawsuit on these actions–I am appalled and sickened—-whoever the Prez is of the teachers union–please call me–so I can empower you to take back the schools for the childrens and families of Willimantic—my # is 860-227-6668—this whole idea in Willimantic is a joke–a sick mistake–and a waste of money–and a disservice to the students and an embarrassment to the profession–We cant let this happen–I will contact Commissioner Pryor and Atty General Jepson to look into the frivolous/juvenile spending of state resources to supposedly help the Willimantic school systems—More bureaucracy and self-enrichment vs $$ getting down to the kids—-I know Mr Pryor wont stand for this –hope I can help-Tom

    • Bill Morrison

      What I am seeing in Willimantic and in Bridgeport reminds me of Hartford all over again, only Adamowski’s actions in Willimantic are more extreme. We need action on the parts of the parents, the teachers, the union, and the press. We must draw the line; we cannot allow this disease to spread any farther.

      • guest

        This is worth a try!

  • Foley is a bigger idiot than Malloy–but I am voting for him next time–and all of my union colleagues will to—–I cant politic for Foley he stands for all the wrong things–but Mr. Malloy’s lack of integrity disturbs me–and if a man doesnt have integrity –he has nothing–so me and all of MY UNION colleagues will be saying goodbye to Mr. Malloy–I hope we have a better option than Foley(tea party)–but if not he still has my vote–Tom NHFT Local 933 VP

    • Bill Morrison

      Thomas,

      I won’t support Foley either. I agree with R.L.; it is time to start backing Third Party candidates.  I also like your strong sense of what a Union is supposed to be!

    • guest

      Let us hope there is a better choice than Foley, and certainly than Malloy.

  • Hey Brutus–your teachers union is doing exactly what you espouse–

  • Guest

    As an unemployed teacher desperately seeking a job, the signing of the contract with TFA infuriates me! Windham Public Schools posted several elementary teaching vacancies in June, listing them as ‘open until filled’. Adamowski has ‘encouraged’ the district to hire TFA teachers to fill these positions. In a community that lacks so much, Adamowski has now succeeded diminishing the stability the schools desperately need. TFA seeks a two-year commitment from it’s ‘teachers’. Administrators report being satisfied with TFA because the mentors advise the teachers to teach to the  test, inflating test scores and making the school look better. There are so many things wrong with the situation, it was easier to post some information from another site. 

    “With respect to the effectiveness of TFA teachers, the New York and Houston studies cited above found that first and second year TFA recruits were less effective than those of fully trained and certified beginning teachers in both math and reading at the elementary level. The small number of TFA recruits who stayed in teaching after the third year became more effective than many other teachers in math (on some tests though not others), but did not fully recoup their lost ground in reading and were particularly ineffective for Spanish-speaking students in both reading and math (examined in the Houston study). A more recent Texas study also found that TFA recruits were less effective than other new teachers in teaching reading to Hispanic students.
    This should not be surprising, given that the TFA 5-week entry model allows little time for learning to teach reading or to acquire the sophisticated techniques needed to teach English learners. The recent Texas-wide study also found that TFA recruits had left at rates more than twice those of other beginners by year three (TFA showed a 44-59% attrition rate as compared to 19 – 24% for other new teachers from other programs).”
    http://blogs.edweek.org/teachers/living-in-dialogue/2012/04/deepening_the_debate_over_teac.html

    “1) The organization has fallen into the trap of believing that test scores are a valid indicator of effectiveness. This leads to a widespread emphasis on test preparation, so that the organization can justify its worth. The TFA coaches I have encountered focus almost exclusively on test data when meeting with their interns, and put great pressure on them to achieve 80% mastery on all their tests. TFA did not invent this destructive game, but they have become adept at playing by these rules. Last year when examining student work with a mentee I saw that all the work looked like a test – nothing but short answer and multiple choice questions. She explained that her students were doing poorly on her weekly tests, so her TFA coach had advised her to make all of her classwork the same format as her tests. The test scores rose, but I do not think the students were learning the material in meaningful ways.
    2) The organization explicitly recruits people for a two-year commitment. In my experience, most interns are just beginning to become effective in their second year. In Oakland, after three years, 75% of our interns are gone. This problem is not limited to Teach For America, but the fact that they make the two-year commitment an explicit part of their design disturbs me. I believe the thing our high needs schools need most is dedicated and stable teachers, willing to invest for the long run. They need teachers to develop a deep understanding of the cultures of our students, and a relationship to the communities in which we work. Teach For America is not responsible for the high turnover at these schools, but by recruiting people for a two-year stint, they are not helping to fix this either.”http://voices.washingtonpost.com/answer-sheet/anthony-cody/veteran-teacher-my-problems-wi.html

  • Since Bush and his “no child left behind” scam our schools have continued to deteriorate in educational standards.  Malloy is as big a disappointment to democrats in CT as Obama is to democrats nationwide.

    Since politics have taken control of our education system I have not seen any discussion with teachers on how to better educate our children. These political arguments always leave out the people that are trained to educate as well as side stepping the parents that have a right to say how their children should be educated and all the politicians do is support their personal agenda that may get them a few votes.

    Nothing will change with this political dumbing down of our children unless the parents take interest and control of their children’s education and demand good educational standards that do not involve political views and maneuvering.

    Malloy is just a common wannabe dictator with education just like he is with the rest of the state government leadership.